Corned Beef Hash ~1895

The Day After St. Patrick's. Nothing like a dinner of heavy food and Guinness to make you fully appreciate fresh salads and fruit smoothies with chia seeds. But those delicious leftovers are beckoning from the fridge! Corned beef hash embraces all of the necessary stick-to-your-ribs kind of meal qualities. High carb. High protein. Savory. Salty.... Continue Reading →

Mary’s Clam Soup ~1875

5 Ingredients or Less Clam Soup Recipe. Hmm... Maybe just make clams in white sauce? Dispense with the soup label. Looks yummy, but there really isn't much in it other than the clams and the butter fat from the cream. It certainly doesn't qualify as a chowder. This particular clam soup recipe calls for 50... Continue Reading →

Classic Potato Soup ~1875

Handwritten Potato Soup Recipe from the 1870s. Here's a gem! Discovering handwritten recipes from the past neatly tucked into cookbooks is like taking hold of one end of a silk ribbon, the other end traversing a winding path through time to the hand of the original author. And like that, we, dear reader, are connected... Continue Reading →

Easy Celery Soup ~1875

Victorian Era Celery Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! I enjoy cream of celery soup, but have yet to make a truly appetizing plain celery soup. Tried a recipe from Mrs. Beeton's a year or so ago, but evidently didn't post it so must not have been anything special and followed the same principles above.... Continue Reading →

Soup a la Julienne ~1875

Victorian Era Vegetable Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819 Camping Soup ~1910 Stock ~1855

How to Drink Milk ~1897

1890s Directions for Drinking Milk. Happy National Milk Day! Do not swallow milk fast and in such big gulps. Sip it slowly. Take four minutes at least to finish a glassful, and do not take more than a good teaspoonful at one sip. When milk goes into your stomach it is instantly curdled. If you... Continue Reading →

Treating Frozen Limbs ~1820

The Successful Treatment of Frozen Limbs in Russia Early 1800s. Today's excerpt comes from The Husbandman and Housewife. The book is exhaustive in terms of breadth and the contents are arranged alphabetically instead of by category. This results in Dressing Fowls immediately preceding Frostbitten Feet. However, after spending time exploring the contents, I have never... Continue Reading →

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