Five Food Principles

Framework for an Early Food Pyramid. Or My Plate, they both work. This excerpt comes from the book Practical Cooking and Serving, 1902. As you read through it, you'll notice that the author has a very scientific orientation towards cooking. We're moving into an era when cooking becomes a science to be understood and mastered.... Continue Reading →

Cabinet Pudding Recipe ~1886

Have you ever had leftover cake in the back of the fridge that's past its prime? Do not throw it out! This  cabinet pudding recipe from 1886 uses stale cake for a novel boiled pudding. Easy to make and delicious.

February Menu ~1884

February Menu 1884. Welcome February! Still waiting for the farmers market to usher in spring vegetables. And waiting... My favorite vendor said that the farm won't have new produce crops until mid-March. Alas, we make do with dandelion greens for salads, parsley, and the ever optimistic seasonal citrus. At some point, I'm going to cover... Continue Reading →

Cheese Straws ~1895

Gluten Free Cheese Straws. Updated Recipe: Preheat oven to 425 F. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper. 1/4 cup butter 1/3 cup parmesan 1/2 cup all-purpose gluten free baking flour (or regular) 1/2 cup gluten free bread crumbs Dash of cayenne and mace to taste 1/8 tsp. salt, omit if using salted butter Note: You can... Continue Reading →

Surprise Eggs ~1895

Literary References in Old Cookbooks. Esteemed Reader, Today's recipe includes a history lesson, cultural references, something of a Victorian rant, and a glimpse of a colorful past. Case in point, we learn that one-third of the crime in this world is due to the direct, although inscrutable, instrumentality of the Devil. I need to use... Continue Reading →

Plain Cake for Children ~1861

Children's Victorian Cake Recipe. Procuring Dough. Curious ingredients. The cake recipe outsources the dough to the local baker, which, as a busy mom, I think is a brilliant solution. They didn't have biscuit tubes or box cake mixes, but this would have been the next best thing. A quartern of dough is about four pounds,... Continue Reading →

On Beverages ~1861

General Observations on Victorian Drinks. Beverages are innumerable in their variety... and may be divided into three classes. We will, however, forthwith treat on the most popular of our beverages beginning with the one which makes "the cup that cheers but not inebriates." Any recipe requests from the list? From Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861.... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton’s Simple Coffee ~1861

A Very Simple Method of Making Coffee. Coffee Preparation in the 1860s All I have to say is: Thank goodness for paper filters! Which leads us to some very interesting trivia. The paper coffee filter was invented by a woman, Melitta Bentz, in 1908. No surprise that a woman would have invented the paper filter.... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Cocoa Recipe ~1861

How To Make Cocoa. Who doesn't love a mug of hot cocoa in mid-winter? This particular recipe, I believe, is missing a key ingredient: sugar. I was out of instant hot chocolate the other weekend and was scouring the cupboard for a special breakfast treat for the kids. The Hershey's powdered baking cocoa has a... Continue Reading →

January Menu ~1884

January Dinner Menu from the 1880s. January Menu Welcome January! This bill of fare for 8 people includes rice, salmon, boiled potatoes, beef fillet, cauliflower, turkey with jelly, celery, and plum pudding. A heart meal for the middle of winter. Happy New Year! Source: Franco-American Cookery Book, 1844. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pork... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Thick Gingerbread ~1861

Classic Gingerbread Recipe. Another seasonal recipe from Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. Come to think of it, ginger 'bread' typically refers to the cookie sort of dessert, not the cake 'bread' version - at least here regionally. Why is that? Treacle is the British term for molasses, lest there be any confusion. Confession time. I... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Christmas Cake ~1861

Simple Christmas Cake Recipe. This Christmas Cake recipe is from the famous Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. A few things about this particular recipe. First, I think it's fascinating how the editors include the average cost of the recipe at the end of each recipe. 1 s. = 1 shilling 6 d. = 6... Continue Reading →

Nutmegs

Classic Recipes Baking with Nutmegs. Getting my nutmeg on with seasonal recipes. Picked up this jar from the store the other day and it sparked images of great trade ships with sails full to the wind embarking on multi-year journeys to bring back this fragrant treasure. Nutmeg was a popular spice 150+ years ago, used in... Continue Reading →

Christmas Turkey ~1855

Boiled Turkey and Gravy Recipe. This recipe is taken from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people.  The cooking method is ingenious, as it's a one-pot Christmas dinner. Included: stuffing, gravy, and soup! I love that it adds bacon to the pot for both salt and flavor. Has anyone tried boiling a whole turkey? I may have... Continue Reading →

Apple Custard ~1881

Apple Custard Recipe 1881 Simple apple custard recipe. Naturally gluten free. I love that it uses the egg custard base - which is the basically the same recipe for cream custard and bread pudding. Ingredients 6 tart apples A little water for stewing Sprinkled white sugar 8 eggs (I would probably do 4-5 large eggs)... Continue Reading →

Household Tips for Tuesday ~1875

5 Helpful Hints for the Home. A fun read, including "a most beautiful application of the science of chemistry." I just can't figure out what the first one is for... What are we leaching? Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Potage au Choux ~1825 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 The Housewife... Continue Reading →

October Menu ~1884

October Menu. Welcome October! Fall is truly here. This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. This menu is quite the production! From stewed frogs to French fries, there's something for everyone. The poor snipe is featured, again. I'm surprised there... Continue Reading →

Pickles ~1819

Preparing for Pickling Season. When I think of a pickling recipe, I think of ingredients. These recipes do their civic duty, however, to warn about poisonous pickling practices. Oh my! Alas, I did not find a good recipe to pickle my green beans in this particular cookbook, so resorted to the WWW. Found this easy... Continue Reading →

Apple Fritters ~1819

Gluten Free Apple Fritters Recipe. New to fritters, here. Was inspired after watching a cooking show and found a simple apple fritter recipe in American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the use of private families, my current kitchen companion. Here's the pancake recipe. Fritter batter is supposed to be runnier than regular pancake... Continue Reading →

Jam ~1819

Early 1800s Strawberry Jam. Who doesn't love strawberry jam on Sunday morning waffles? Antique cookbooks can be curious reads - as much for of what they include as what they exclude. I went searching for a strawberry jam recipe hoping to preserve some strawberries for the winter months ahead. Most cookbooks will include a section... Continue Reading →

Rice Edging ~1819

Rice Edging Recipe. Rice is a big staple in our home due to our strict gluten-free diets. Whenever a new rice recipe surfaces, I'm always interested! A side of rice is so blah.  A rice edge? Kind of edgy...  The next time I entertain, I am going to try making a rice edging for my... Continue Reading →

Baked Tomatoes ~1819

Early 1800s Baked Tomato Recipe. Here's an easy recipe that celebrates the end-of-summer harvest! Baked tomatoes are one of my favorite side dishes. Ingredients Round tomatoes, cut in half Herbs Salt/Pepper Bake on parchment paper at 350 degrees for 25 minutes. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Not to Blame ~1891 Defining ‘Appetit’ ~ Late... Continue Reading →

September Menu ~1884

September Menu 1884. Welcome September! Where did the summer go? This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. Today's menu features Ox-Cheeck, a la Nelson, fish with a chili sauce (which actually looks delicious - omitting catawba wine), veal, duck, lots... Continue Reading →

American Domestic Cookery ~1819

Introduction. Time for a new cookbook! We finished off The art of cookery made plain and easy, 1805, it was heavy on the meat butchery and dressing of meat. Which I enjoy as much as the next person, but I'm simply not in the position to go out and butcher me a pig... My life is... Continue Reading →

Hysterical Water~1805

Hysterical Water Recipe. An entertaining find! Anyone heard of hysterical water? This is a new one for me. Ingredients include, but are not limited to: roots of lovage, mistletoe of the oak, and a quarter pound of dried millipedes. Umm... okay. European mistletoe was toxic. And so is the cyanide in millipedes (alive - I'm... Continue Reading →

Mysteries of Puddings ~1805

How to Boil Pudding. Today's post answers a question that I've long had about the mystery of boiled puddings. You'll often come across recipes for boiled puddings tied up in cloth, but I could never picture how this functioned practically: If you have a liquid mixture tied in a bag and then placed into a... Continue Reading →

To Keep Meat Hot ~1805

Clever Cooking Tip. Brilliant way of keeping meat hot without drying it out. I've certainly had meat from restaurants that could have employed some method akin to that described above. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Derby Time! Mint Julep ~1886 Gridirons ~1855 War and Potatoes ~1917 Source: The art of cookery made plain and... Continue Reading →

Onion Sauce ~1855

Recipe for Onion Sauce. Onions are over-flowing in our farmer's market - both fresh green onions and dried onions. Thinking about giving this one a try - it would be pretty oniony. Not sure about the sugar. I could see this pairing well on top of roasted pork chops. Have you made an onion sauce... Continue Reading →

12 Sandwich Recipes ~1897

One Dozen Unique Sandwich Recipes. From the 1890s. The first image on this one is pretty bad - but we're going with it because it's such a great find. Not your typical sandwich shop list. Here's to some inspiration! "In making sandwiches, whether for traveling,  lunches or for any entertainment, home-made bread is the better for... Continue Reading →

Pigeon Season ~1800

Pigeon Recipes. "A pig and a pigeon should never be cold." Pigeons pair with vegetables, French beans, asparagus, and cucumber. Boiled! Broiled! Yum! Source: The New London Cookery and Complete Domestic Guide, 1800. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Macaroni and Cheese ~1897 Kitchen Woodcut ~1810 Rice Pudding ~1917

Habits of Economy ~1800

Gravy, Broth, or Soup. Do you save your drippings? If so, what do you use them for? Here's an excerpt on saving drippings and broths to make soup and collect grease for frying. In our household, I save chicken drippings for soup all of the time. Here's the most recent addition: You can see the... Continue Reading →

August Menu ~1884

Victorian Menu for August 1800s. Welcome August! This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. It's meat heavy, which is surprising given that in most places August delivers wonderful bounty from the garden. The Bevarois aux peches recipe gets my vote!... Continue Reading →

Raspberry Wine ~1810

Berry Season! This raspberry wine recipe comes from A New System of Domestic Cookery (1810). What I really like about it is that (1) it's a simple recipe that's pretty much spot-on in terms of process, and (2) it's small batch. Typically these recipes come in batches of 50 gallons, so this one is a... Continue Reading →

Independence Cake ~1866

Wait... How many people is this supposed to serve?!? And just how big is this oven? Forget the oven - how big was the bowl??? Obviously an Independence Day celebration back in 1866 was some celebration! Bring on the party! Ingredients 20 lbs. of flour 15 lbs. of sugar 10 lbs. of butter 4 dozen... Continue Reading →

July Menu ~1884

July Menu 1884. Welcome July! This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year (Check out last July's menu, here). Here's to summer! This is a truly seasonal menu, you find a vegetable soup with asparagus and carrots, boiled artichokes, and raspberry ice-cream.... Continue Reading →

Butchery ~1807

Kitchen Knives, etc. Back to the kitchen for today's post! Saw these and thought the illustrations were fascinating, in a macabre kind of way. I'm familiar with larding needles and meat cleavers, but a cutlet bat is a new one. Additional instruments for the home cook: meat saw, chopping boards, basins, and knives. From a... Continue Reading →

Summer Dining ~1897

Late Victorian Picnic Sketch. Montgomery Ward & co.'s Common sense cookery. 1897 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Victorian Picnic Menu ~1880 Ice Cream ~1866 Fried Tomatoes ~ 1866  

Macaroni and Cheese ~1897

Macaroni and Cheese Recipe. For all of you macaroni and cheese lovers out there, here's one for you! My nieces are big fans, but this isn't your typical box style mac & cheese... Talk about a unique preparation! The sauce and cheese are layered separately throughout the dish. Here's another macaroni and cheese recipe from... Continue Reading →

Cucumber Recipes ~1897

Cucumbers Raw, Fried, and on Toast. The first piles of cucumbers showed up in our farmers market this week! Looking for ways to enjoy them beyond salad? How about frying them up and serving them on toast? The handy vegetable slicer is an added 19th century kitchen gadget bonus. Here's to summer's bounty! More Fun... Continue Reading →

Deviled Eggs ~1897

Vertical Style. Here's to a hors d'oeuvres conversation starter for! This recipe for deviled eggs calls for standing them up instead of having them lie sideways. I wonder when this style went out of vogue? The next time we make deviled eggs, will give it a go! Source: Motgomery Ward and Co's Common Sense Cookery, 1897. More... Continue Reading →

Cherry Wine Recipe ~1825

Homemade Cherry Wine. Looking for a cherry wine recipe? This one looks like it has potential. The primary fermentation is spot on in terms of process. I love how they burry it in sand to keep the must cool and then top it with a vine leaf - what imagery! The recipe even calls for... Continue Reading →

Family Sauce ~1825

Sauce a tous Mets. One can never have enough sauce recipes! Here's one that requires some planning ahead (8 hours), but could probably work in a slow cooker. Ingredients: 1 pint stock 1 large glass white wine Pepper/salt A little thin lemon peel (guesses on amount?) Bay leave Dash of good vinegar Yum! More Fun... Continue Reading →

Potato Pudding ~1877

Potato Pudding Recipe. Note: 41 ounces is about 2.5 lbs. That's quite a bit of potato! Perfect for leftover mashed potatoes. 4 ounces of butter is 1 stick. Will post this with every intention of coming back to experiment. If it comes out edible, has potential as a gluten free dessert. I just finished watching... Continue Reading →

June Menu ~1884

June Menu 1884. Welcome June! This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year (Check out last June's menu, here). Here's to summer! This Garbure a la Clermont looks delicious - something akin to a French onion soup, which makes sense given that... Continue Reading →

Orange Salad ~1855

1850s Orange and Brandy Salad Recipe. Dessert or Salad? I posted this recipe previously, but finally had a chance to go back and make it for a gathering - with great success! Ingredients: 6 Oranges 1/4 cup white sugar 1/4 pint or 1 teacup of brandy, rum, or Madeira Notes: Make ahead and let chill... Continue Reading →

Defining ‘Appetit’ ~ Late 1800s

The Very Definition of Appetite. This is my kind of dictionary. For your reading pleasure: "Motion and life create in the living body a constant loss of substance, and the human body, which is a most complicated machinery, would soon be unfit for the use if Providence did not provide it with a compensating balance,... Continue Reading →

Melted Butter Sauce ~1855

Recipe for Melted Butter. The great diplomatist, Talleyrand, used to say, that England had 120 religions, but only one sauce, and that melted butter. Melted butter is for the table of the simple artizan. Enjoyed some with artichokes the other evening. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks... Continue Reading →

Black Butter Sauce ~1855

Recipe for Black Butter. Huh. I had to read and re-read this recipe about 4 times. Definitely a cliff-hanger of sorts here... What article would be suitable for this kind of sauce? Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Hot Chocolate (American and French) ~1897 Fried Cauliflower ~1887... Continue Reading →

Dictionary of Foods

Culinary Encyclopedia. New book! So excited! The Dictionary of Foods and Culinary Encyclopedia, 5th Edition, by C. Herman Senn. No idea when it was printed, and my cursory internet sleuthing only turned up the 1st Edition from 1898. Check it out here. C. Herman Senn was also known for the ever popular works of: Recherché Entreés, and... Continue Reading →

Preserved Violets ~1890

Recipe for Preserved, Candied Violets. Violets are coming into bloom - or will be shortly - here in the northern hemisphere. Has anyone ever had preserved violets? I've done something similar with sugared rose petals. I don't have access to violets, but this was such a unique recipe I had to post it. Source: Fisherman... Continue Reading →

Random Household Hints ~1886

Household Hints. Ever wonder about: boiling coffee, cleaning your stovepipe, making glue for mounting ferns and seaweed, slicing pineapple, and mashing potatoes? Quite the collection! Enjoy! Source: Abbeville Messenger, 1886. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Garlic ~1885 Fried Cauliflower ~1887 Rice and Cheese 1913

Small Kitchen Stove Advertisement ~1855

Apparatus for Heating, Cooking, and Ventilating by Gas. Description. The more economical cousin of the deluxe gas stove shown here, this must-have kitchen apparatus will roast meat, bake a pie, and heat your soup all at once! Love it! Unsure as to how the ironing would happen here... but still, amazing little gas stove! Source:... Continue Reading →

Victorian Gas Stove Advertisement ~1855

Apparatus for Heating, Cooking, and Ventilating by Gas. Description. Check out this baby! Decorative and functional! For those who need an endorsement, how about Her Majesty's Royal Letters Patent? An apparatus worthy the attention of Men of Science, and the Culinary Art... Extra Credit for incorporating the word PERNICIOUS in an advertisement! Source: Soyer's Shilling... Continue Reading →

Alarum Clock ~1855

Alarm Clock - New Kitchen Invention. No microwave timer? No smartphone alarm? No problem! Check out this newest and most handiest of inventions, the alarum, or cooking clock. (Alarum is the British spelling) Note the N.B. - If the fire isn't the correct temperature, the alarm clock will not serve much of a purpose. Makes... Continue Reading →

Mushrooms ~1855

Very Unique Mushroom Recipe. Alexis starts off in the typical style, with prose to Eloise...leading into the recipe proper for a mushroom sandwich, which is truly unique. If I understand correctly, the recipe came to Alexis through some divine intervention. Glass jars? Vapor? Check out that last sentence - I want to know what kind... Continue Reading →

On Pies ~1855

Introductory Material on Pies. Priceless line: "To pass in review these culinary victims..." I'm going to tuck that one aside for later use. It seems Alexis has a pet peeve for pies. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Potage au Choux ~1825 Crust and Lentil Puree Soup... Continue Reading →

May Menu ~1884

May Menu 1884. Welcome May! This month's menu again comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. Here's to spring! The prawn sauce looks delicious! Sirloin of Beef: That is a lot of beef for 8 people. More Fun Menus from Antique Cookbooks April... Continue Reading →

Omelettes ~1855

Recipes for Omelettes. Just in time for Sunday brunch, the omelette round-up. "Where is the man or woman cook but says they know how to make an omelette, and that to perfection? But this is rarely the case..." Simple Omelette Recipe. Note: Adding milk makes the omelette puffy, and lighter. Giving it more bulk as... Continue Reading →

National Galette and Social Class ~1855

National French Cake Recipe. Today's excerpt is slightly longer, but offers us a glimpse into Parisian night-life in 1855. I love how Alexis uses extended preambles as a lead in to the actual recipes. You see this in celebrity cookbooks today. For readers who are theater-goers, this post is a special treat! Oh! The imagery... Continue Reading →

Eggs ~1855

Background on Eggs. Historical footnote on Orpheus, Pythagoras and their eggs, which you may or may not have known already: And then we find this footnote about Egyptians slinging their eggs around.  Is this true?!? Any other interesting tidbits on eggs out there?   Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries... Continue Reading →

Spring Nettles ~1855

Recipe for Nettles. Nettles? Anyone? The health benefits of nettles are well known - something of a cure all and immune booster. I had them for the first time about a month ago at a local winery's celebrity chef cook-off. It was sautéed in yummy goodness and smothered in five spice dressing. Not what typically comes... Continue Reading →

How to Choose a Potato ~1855

Selecting Potatoes. If, on the contrary.... Wow. This is way more than I ever knew about selecting potatoes. I don't think that I realized there were gradients of flavor or texture. Huh. Learn something every day. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Ice Cream ~1866 Potato Puff... Continue Reading →

Cottage Cooking ~1855

Victorian Domestic Economy.   For those readers who enjoy peeking into the past, this excerpt offers a wonderful view of family life in a English cottage circa 1850. You have a multi-generational home, picky eaters, and a glimpse at food prices. Fascinating. Enjoy! Have a wonderful day! Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855.... Continue Reading →

Bubble and Squeak ~1855

Corned Beef and Cabbage. Being of Irish surname name, I have had many (many) conversations over the course of my life about St. Patrick's Day traditions. Specifically, several people have shared (repeatedly) how corned beef and cabbage isn't actually an Irish 'thing'. Well, all of those people were right. Insofar as it was not called... Continue Reading →

Curious Effects of Imagination ~1855

On Imagination and Food. Check on these next two stories from Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, circa 1855. Alexis was a formidable writer expressing self-confidence, wit, and irreverence. Enjoy! He actually has a point on that last part. Now we turn to politics, however... Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from... Continue Reading →

Mutton Chops ~1855

Mutton Chop Recipe. In my opinion... Love how this recipe is written! As someone in the language business, this first sentence is fabulous. I should pass it along to my daughter's high school English teacher so that the class can practice sentence diagraming - a fine, under appreciated skill. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the... Continue Reading →

On Ox Cheeks ~1855

Humorous Ox Cheek Story. Back, once again, with another entertaining excerpt from Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, circa 1855. The readers will be reminded that the author writes of accounts working with the Irish peasantry during the potato famine and this current collection of recipes is intended to provide economical and nutritious recipes for... Continue Reading →

Lamb ~1855

  On Lamb. Soyer's shilling cookery for the people  is a gift on every page. Here's a little smile to start your day. On lamb... The book treats us to one (1) simple recipe for lamb: More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks How Funny We Feel ~1831 Orange Salad ~1855 Pumpkin Diet Drink ~1885

Curing Ham ~1855

How to Cure Ham. Another gem from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people, this one on the essential skill of curing ham. Even if you don't think that you'll ever need to cure your own ham, this excerpt is immensely entertaining. Enjoy! Anyone who can work in mummification into a cookbook has a gift for written imagery!... Continue Reading →

Gridirons ~1855

Gridiron. Another great excerpt from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people! Here's everything you need to know about gridirons: I couldn't find a photo of the hanging wire gridiron. I found what looks like a hanging flat griddle, but that's not what is described above. If anyone knows more about this one, please pass it along in... Continue Reading →

Stock ~1855

Simple Stock Recipe. I'm exploring Soyer's shilling cookery for the people. The author has an absolutely delightful writing style, writing the book in a correspondence style to Eloise. Here's the introduction to soup: And here's the first lesson for Stock for Clear Soup: More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Potato Omelet ~ 1900 Risot a la... Continue Reading →

Crust and Lentil Puree Soup ~1825

Potage de Croûte a la Purée. Prep. Time: 5 min Cook Time: 20 min Serves: 4 Ingredients: 2 cups lentils 6 - 10 cups broth 4 slices bread/ 2 cups bread crusts 1/2 cup meat drippings (chicken) Pre-heat oven 350°. Step 1: Place the drippings in the bottom of an oven-safe tureen. Put the bread... Continue Reading →

Tomato Butter ~ 1876 (aka Ketchup)

Easy ketchup recipe - nope, sorry "tomato butter" recipe. 3 ingredients or less! Ingredients: 10 Lbs. tomatoes 4 Lbs. brown sugar 1 qt. vinegar More Fun Discoveries Fried Tomatoes ~ 1866 Cures: Teething, Scurvy, Rattlesnakes, Etc. ~1856 Zucchini! I Found You! ~1880

Ragout of Carrots ~1825

Ragout of Carrots - French Style Recipe. I've been wanting to try this recipe for several weeks, and haven't had the chance until recently. Prep. Time: 8 min. Total Time: 25 min. Servings: 4 Ingredients: 8 medium carrots - peeled, chopped into 2 inch pieces Water 2 cups broth (chicken) 2 cups dry white wine... Continue Reading →

April Menu ~1884

April Menu 1884. Welcome April! This month's menu again comes from the Franc-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. The puree of asparagus looks fantastic! Let us take a moment to appreciate the food processor and blender. Mashing asparagus through a sieve would so not be... Continue Reading →

Easter Dinner Menu ~1900

Easter Menu at Glen-Ethel. Looking for Easter dinner ideas? What a spread! Not sure what all of these are, but I'm guessing no one left the table hungry. Source: Abbeville Press and Banner, 1900. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Meringued Coffee ~1897 Indian Slap-Jacks ~1886 L’Eau de la Vie Recipe 1837

Easter Egg Dyes ~1886

Dying Easter Eggs in the 1800s. And then... But what about gold and silver eggs? This one was new: Caution: Dying Easter eggs à la 1800s style is a grand experiment for the adventurous! Check out our household mishaps here. Source: The Midland Journal, 1886. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks To Carve Roast Turkey ~1886... Continue Reading →

Spinage ~1825

Spinach Recipe. Any spinach fans out there? I thought this recipe outlined considerable effort on the part of the cook to make sure that the spinage (spinach) is sufficiently clean. Wash several times to clean Boil Form into balls, squeeze excess water Spread out onto table and check again for extraneous substances... That, my friends,... Continue Reading →

Vegetable Fritters ~1893

Vegetable Fritter Recipes. Cucumber Fritters - I'm not so sure about this. I never think of cooking cucumbers. Pea Fritters  Beet Fritters The beet recipe is involved, but has potential for some interesting flavors. I think the beet/onion patty would have a tendency to fall apart when frying - at least in my kitchen. Cymling... Continue Reading →

Economical Wine ~1825

Economical Homemade Wine Recipe.     If you're a home winemaker, read this one closely. It gets better, and better. How does economical wine work? You start with a cask and fill it partially with water. As fruit refuse becomes available (or any fruit for that matter), you throw it into the cask. Then, you... Continue Reading →

Rice Croquettes ~1876

Rice Croquette Recipe. As a strictly gluten-free household blessed with 66% Celiacs, we go through a lot of rice. A lot. As such, I am always looking for new ways to reinvent rice (and potatoes, and corn tortillas, but I digress...). This search led me to rice croquettes. Here are two variations: Being the industrious... Continue Reading →

Raw Food Diet ~1900

Raw Food Dinner Menu. This excerpt comes from a NY evening newspaper article. It features a dinner party with a doctor, his wife, one of his patients, and the reporter. The headline focuses on the cost of the dinner (.60), but the narrative itself discusses the menu times.  And then... Certain proof that paleo is... Continue Reading →

French Culinary System: Advantage 4 ~1825

(Final) Prefatory Matter on French Cooking.   TL;DR: Fourth Advantage of French Cooking Practical facility Source: French Domestic Cookery, 1825 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Fun Antique Cookbook Titles Cream Custard ~1866 Eating an Artichoke ~1886

French Culinary System: Advantage 3 ~1825

(More) Prefatory Matter on French Cooking.   TL;DR: Third Advantage of French Cooking Combines "Luxury with health and economy" i.e., healthy! Source: French Domestic Cookery, 1825 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Fun Antique Cookbook Titles Cream Custard ~1866 Eating an Artichoke ~1886

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