Pickles ~1819

Preparing for Pickling Season. When I think of a pickling recipe, I think of ingredients. These recipes do their civic duty, however, to warn about poisonous pickling practices. Oh my! Alas, I did not find a good recipe to pickle my green beans in this particular cookbook, so resorted to the WWW. Found this easy... Continue Reading →

Melon Conduciveness ~1904

Eating Melon. The premise is thus: Not all melons are ripe when you cut them open, so to make them edible, first take out a small slice; next, pour in sherry, champagne, or brandy. Replace the slice, rotate the melon gently to make sure the liquor is evenly distributed. Chill. Serve. Cantaloup obviously has a... Continue Reading →

Thousand Island ~1917

Thousand Island Salad Dressing Recipe. Salad dressing recipes are few and far between in the older cookbooks. This recipe for Thousand Island Salad Dressing comes from a slightly newer publication of 1917, and is both novel and familiar at the same time. A hard feat to pull off for a 101-year-old salad dressing! What I... Continue Reading →

Spinage ~1825

Spinach Recipe. Any spinach fans out there? I thought this recipe outlined considerable effort on the part of the cook to make sure that the spinage (spinach) is sufficiently clean. Wash several times to clean Boil Form into balls, squeeze excess water Spread out onto table and check again for extraneous substances... That, my friends,... Continue Reading →

Black Bean Soup 1924

Black Bean Soup Recipe. Black bean soup has that reputation for being a hearty, soul-filling soup. In our household, black bean soup usually comes in a can (slightly embarrassing confession for a blog about home cooking). This recipe comes from Fannie Farmer's famous Boston School of Cooking book, once again. My edition is circa 1924... Continue Reading →

Dandelion Salad ~1844

Ah, spring is finely here! We passed a yard the other day and it was covered with dandelions. Inspiration struck! We gathered our paring knives and headed out to the yard for a mini foraging expedition. Dandelion recipes are found in just about every circa 1800s cookbook I've ever read. Most common are the boiled... Continue Reading →

Boiled Celery Recipe ~1886

What a perfect celery pyramid! Originally from the Mediterranean region, humans have cultivated celery for thousands of years. Here in the U.S., we typically only eat the stalks and leaves. I had never thought of cooking and serving the ends of celery (wait, they're called the 'heads'...). Typically the ends go to our pet rabbits... Continue Reading →

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