On Puddings ~1747

3 Classic Recipes for Puddings from the Georgian Era. Today we have three distinct pudding recipes. I'm adding them to the blog as a sort of indexed reminder as I would very much like to come back and try them. The lemons are in season here and I pass several trees tucked away in the... Continue Reading →

Cookbook Subscribers ~1747

How Books Were Printed in the 1700s. Looking for Character Names? In the Introduction to The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy (1747), written by A Lady, the authoress includes a list of names of subscribers. Here's what the interwebs have to say about subscribers, credit to U Penn Library for writing about the... Continue Reading →

Hysterical Water~1805

Hysterical Water Recipe. An entertaining find! Anyone heard of hysterical water? This is a new one for me. Ingredients include, but are not limited to: roots of lovage, mistletoe of the oak, and a quarter pound of dried millipedes. Umm... okay. European mistletoe was toxic. And so is the cyanide in millipedes (alive - I'm... Continue Reading →

Mysteries of Puddings ~1805

How to Boil Pudding. Today's post answers a question that I've long had about the mystery of boiled puddings. You'll often come across recipes for boiled puddings tied up in cloth, but I could never picture how this functioned practically: If you have a liquid mixture tied in a bag and then placed into a... Continue Reading →

To Keep Meat Hot ~1805

Clever Cooking Tip. Brilliant way of keeping meat hot without drying it out. I've certainly had meat from restaurants that could have employed some method akin to that described above. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Derby Time! Mint Julep ~1886 Gridirons ~1855 War and Potatoes ~1917 Source: The art of cookery made plain and... Continue Reading →

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