Random Updates.

Blog & Life Updates. Happy Sunday! To all my loyal readers - and even those of you who are more of the itinerant sort (that's OKAY, I love you, too!) - this past week has been full of life! Work travel, time zone changes, catching up with family ... Convivial Supper has been aptly placed... Continue Reading →

Corned Beef Hash ~1895

The Day After St. Patrick's. Nothing like a dinner of heavy food and Guinness to make you fully appreciate fresh salads and fruit smoothies with chia seeds. But those delicious leftovers are beckoning from the fridge! Corned beef hash embraces all of the necessary stick-to-your-ribs kind of meal qualities. High carb. High protein. Savory. Salty.... Continue Reading →

Pie Day ~1947

Classic Recipes to Celebrate Pie Day. Happy Pi(e) Day! Here are a few fun pie recipes to help celebrate the day. Mother’s Pumpkin Pie ~1875 Pie or Cobbler? ~1910 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 On Pies ~1855 Thanksgiving Pie “The Crown of the Feast”~1866 Apples Prepared for Nice Pies ~1851  

Shamrock Croutons ~1917

St. Patrick's Day Crouton Recipe. An easy recipe inspired by Bettina! Source: A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband, c. 1917. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks La Ditta R. Petra Wine Co. 1913 How To Set The Luncheon Table ~1899 Navigating Antique Cookbooks 101

Friday Menu ~1923

I love this menu - lots of variety! Note the ligheter, meatless dinner. Along with three easy recipes: Doughnuts, Corned Beef Hash, and Maple Wafers.

March ~1917

Poem from Bettina. March is upon us, one of the more challenging months. Here's a short poem from the wonderfully entertaining A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband that expresses all. Weary are we of winter-time fare; Hasten, O Springtime, elusive and arch! Bring us your danties, our cupboards are bare! Pitty us! Starved by... Continue Reading →

Dora and Jack 1923

Cream of Wheat Advertisement. Love this Cream of Wheat advertisement from a 1923 American Cookery magazine. How will you, dear reader, spend Valentine's Day? Any romantic plans? Maybe spend a few moments making googly eyes over a bowl of hot cereal in the morning before dashing off to work? Wisps of steam curling through the... Continue Reading →

Cabinet Pudding Recipe ~1886

Have you ever had leftover cake in the back of the fridge that's past its prime? Do not throw it out! This  cabinet pudding recipe from 1886 uses stale cake for a novel boiled pudding. Easy to make and delicious.

February Menu ~1884

February Menu 1884. Welcome February! Still waiting for the farmers market to usher in spring vegetables. And waiting... My favorite vendor said that the farm won't have new produce crops until mid-March. Alas, we make do with dandelion greens for salads, parsley, and the ever optimistic seasonal citrus. At some point, I'm going to cover... Continue Reading →

Cheese Straws ~1895

Gluten Free Cheese Straws. Updated Recipe: Preheat oven to 425 F. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper. 1/4 cup butter 1/3 cup parmesan 1/2 cup all-purpose gluten free baking flour (or regular) 1/2 cup gluten free bread crumbs Dash of cayenne and mace to taste 1/8 tsp. salt, omit if using salted butter Note: You can... Continue Reading →

Frugal Friday ~1917

Classic Tips for Saving Food. Happy Friday, all! Made it through another week. I was in the car the other day with The Boy and we heard a public service message about food waste. Did you know: Consumers are responsible for more wasted food than farmers, grocery stores, restaurants, or any other part of the... Continue Reading →

Preserving Butter ~1827

Three Options for Saving Butter. Nostalgic for Creameries. The word creamery conjures images of black and white Holstein dairy cows grazing on green fields of wavy grassland dotted with white daisies and yellow clover under azure blue skies filled with happy, puffy white clouds. Growing up in a rural town surrounded by pasturelands, our class... Continue Reading →

Victor Hugo and Eggs ~1895

What Victor Hugo Says about Eggs. Victor Hugo was accustomed to say that there were few things more inherently equivocal than an egg, and that he never broke the shell of one without a dim apprehension that the unexpected might suddenly make its appearance. Source: The Thorough Good Cook, 1895. More Fun Discoveries from Antique... Continue Reading →

The New London Cookery ~1827

Frugality. Comfort. Elegance. Title page and frontispiece from the New London Cookery Book. Lovely. And... Numerous Useful Miscellaneous Receipts. Source: New London Cookery, By A Lady, 1827. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks The Farmer’s Wife Introduction ~1780 Summer Luncheon Menu ~1913 Household Finances ~1819  

On Ghosts and Potatoes ~1895

Cooking with Potatoes in the 1800s. Madame de Stael said that she did not believe in ghosts, but that she was afraid of them. Not much more paradoxical is it, I hope, for me to say that, although I do not believe in potatoes, I recognise their great value in the alimentation of humanity. The... Continue Reading →

Surprise Eggs ~1895

Literary References in Old Cookbooks. Esteemed Reader, Today's recipe includes a history lesson, cultural references, something of a Victorian rant, and a glimpse of a colorful past. Case in point, we learn that one-third of the crime in this world is due to the direct, although inscrutable, instrumentality of the Devil. I need to use... Continue Reading →

Plain Cake for Children ~1861

Children's Victorian Cake Recipe. Procuring Dough. Curious ingredients. The cake recipe outsources the dough to the local baker, which, as a busy mom, I think is a brilliant solution. They didn't have biscuit tubes or box cake mixes, but this would have been the next best thing. A quartern of dough is about four pounds,... Continue Reading →

How to Drink Milk ~1897

1890s Directions for Drinking Milk. Happy National Milk Day! Do not swallow milk fast and in such big gulps. Sip it slowly. Take four minutes at least to finish a glassful, and do not take more than a good teaspoonful at one sip. When milk goes into your stomach it is instantly curdled. If you... Continue Reading →

On Beverages ~1861

General Observations on Victorian Drinks. Beverages are innumerable in their variety... and may be divided into three classes. We will, however, forthwith treat on the most popular of our beverages beginning with the one which makes "the cup that cheers but not inebriates." Any recipe requests from the list? From Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861.... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton’s Simple Coffee ~1861

A Very Simple Method of Making Coffee. Coffee Preparation in the 1860s All I have to say is: Thank goodness for paper filters! Which leads us to some very interesting trivia. The paper coffee filter was invented by a woman, Melitta Bentz, in 1908. No surprise that a woman would have invented the paper filter.... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Cocoa Recipe ~1861

How To Make Cocoa. Who doesn't love a mug of hot cocoa in mid-winter? This particular recipe, I believe, is missing a key ingredient: sugar. I was out of instant hot chocolate the other weekend and was scouring the cupboard for a special breakfast treat for the kids. The Hershey's powdered baking cocoa has a... Continue Reading →

Ginger Wine Recipe ~1770

How to Make Ginger Wine. Ginger wine is traditionally made from ginger and raisins and first appeared in Britain in the 1740s. The wine can be fortified with brandy or cognac, or even diluted with lemonade. An interesting historical note: There was a widely held belief at the time that ginger wine helped prevent cholera,... Continue Reading →

January Menu ~1884

January Dinner Menu from the 1880s. January Menu Welcome January! This bill of fare for 8 people includes rice, salmon, boiled potatoes, beef fillet, cauliflower, turkey with jelly, celery, and plum pudding. A heart meal for the middle of winter. Happy New Year! Source: Franco-American Cookery Book, 1844. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pork... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Thick Gingerbread ~1861

Classic Gingerbread Recipe. Another seasonal recipe from Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. Come to think of it, ginger 'bread' typically refers to the cookie sort of dessert, not the cake 'bread' version - at least here regionally. Why is that? Treacle is the British term for molasses, lest there be any confusion. Confession time. I... Continue Reading →

Celebrating New Year’s Eve Victorian Style.

Dinner. Dancing. Merriment. Starting with dinner. A full menu with oysters, crudités, bass, Hollandaise sauce, melted potatoes, prime beef, Yorkshire pudding, brussel sprouts, stuffed eggplant, a goose, sweet potatoes, celery, beets, mayonnaise, plum pudding with hard sauce, cheese, fruit and coffee. Moving to dancing. To general merriment. Bon-bon parties! Bean bag parties! And oh-so much more! How... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Christmas Cake ~1861

Simple Christmas Cake Recipe. This Christmas Cake recipe is from the famous Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. A few things about this particular recipe. First, I think it's fascinating how the editors include the average cost of the recipe at the end of each recipe. 1 s. = 1 shilling 6 d. = 6... Continue Reading →

Nutmegs

Classic Recipes Baking with Nutmegs. Getting my nutmeg on with seasonal recipes. Picked up this jar from the store the other day and it sparked images of great trade ships with sails full to the wind embarking on multi-year journeys to bring back this fragrant treasure. Nutmeg was a popular spice 150+ years ago, used in... Continue Reading →

On Puddings ~1747

3 Classic Recipes for Puddings from the Georgian Era. Today we have three distinct pudding recipes. I'm adding them to the blog as a sort of indexed reminder as I would very much like to come back and try them. The lemons are in season here and I pass several trees tucked away in the... Continue Reading →

Cookbook Subscribers ~1747

How Books Were Printed in the 1700s. Looking for Character Names? In the Introduction to The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy (1747), written by A Lady, the authoress includes a list of names of subscribers. Here's what the interwebs have to say about subscribers, credit to U Penn Library for writing about the... Continue Reading →

A Supper in December ~1770

Georgian Menu and Table Layout. Source: The complete English cook; or, Prudent housewife. Being, a collection of the most general, yet least expensive receipts in every branch of cookery and good housewifery, with directions for roasting, boiling, stewing [etc.] ... together with directions for placing dishes on tables of entertainment: and many other things equally... Continue Reading →

Plain and Elaborate Christmas Dinners ~1904

Christmas Menus for All Budgets and Households.   This series of menus really offers a unique glimpse into how families of different sizes and means would celebrate the holiday dinner. There are some similarities: oysters, roast turkey, cranberries, salted nuts, and coffee. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Dear Santa ~1900 On Oysters and Chicken... Continue Reading →

Snapdragon and Roast Goose ~1900

1900s Christmas Game. Yup. I've been to parties where I could see that people would think that lighting alcohol on fire would be a good idea. And for the table: Roast Goose Recipe Source: Cameron County Press, 1900. More Fun Discoveries From Antique Cookbooks Christmas Dinner Menu ~1889 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 Christmas Eggnog... Continue Reading →

Hot Wine 1912

Warm Wine Recipe with Lemon and Cinnamon. Red or white? Either works! Classic mulled wine recipe to warm you inside and out through those long, frigid nights with just a few simple ingredients: Wine Brown sugar Cinnamon Orange/lemon rind Cheers! Source: Simple Italian Cookery, 1912 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Soup for the Poor... Continue Reading →

Holiday Humor ~1899

Victorian Christmas Cartoon Late 1800s. Happy holidays! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks. A Little Cooking Humor ~1897 10 Victorian Jokes ~ Advertisements 1897      

Coffee Monday El Perco ~1911

Happy Monday! How about free coffee and wafers while you're shopping? El Perco - Is this short for The Perco(lator)? Very clever, indeed. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Camping Soup ~1910 Fried Quoits~1910 Lighthouse Kitchen ~1855

Corby Cake ~1915

Celebrating National Cake Day! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Chocolate Cake ~1897 Golden Sunshine Cake – 1922 Meets 2017 Teen Cannelons With Cream ~1886

To Re-Cook Cold Turkey ~1881

Leftover Turkey Recipe. Hope all of my readers who celebrate Thanksgiving enjoyed a lovely day! We had the traditional meal here with my folks. Good company, good food, good memories. Of course, one of the side benefits of having a large, traditional feast are the leftovers. It's an excuse to eat that piece of pumpkin... Continue Reading →

Thanksgiving ~1911

Thanksgiving from the Bisbee Daily, 1911. Happy Holidays,  Convivial Supper More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Jellied Turkey ~1897 To Re-Cook Cold Turkey 1881 Inseparable from the Charm of the Turkey Is the Dressing Thereof ~1905  

Late 1800s Thanksgiving

Classic Thanksgiving Recipes. How about: Chicken Pie, Stuffing, Orange Salad, Corn Pudding, and Banana Fritters? Nice to mix it up from the old turkey and cranberry routine! Still not thrilled with the quality of the images, but the content is there! Turkey Alternative. Stuffing. Sides. Dessert. Source: The Anaconda Standard, 1898. More Fun Discoveries from Antique... Continue Reading →

7 Thanksgiving Menus ~1898

Good Things to Eat on Thanksgiving. Admittedly, the images on these menus are pretty poor. However, this find is such a delight that they just had to be shared. Check out the link below to see the entire page - recipes and all. Too busy changing the sheets for your house guests' imminent arrival? Or... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday Yuban WWI ~1917

WWI Yuban Coffee Advertisement. To all who celebrate Armistice Day or Veterans Day. "There is no shortage of coffee. You may drink as much as you are accustomed to - You will not deprive the soldiers or the women and children abroad of their share." Great find! Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries American Domestic Cookery... Continue Reading →

Don’t Waste Bread ~1916

Le Pain. Translation: Our duty is not to waste bread. From a group of posters designed by school children and others, some marked "Affiche composée par les enfants de France pour la prévoyance et les économies." Celebrating the 100th anniversary to the end of WWI. To honor the event, I am sharing several posters under... Continue Reading →

WWI Save Bread Propaganda ~1919

Eat Potatoes. From a group of posters designed by school children. As someone who is deathly allergic to bread, these children largely reflect how I feel in the kitchen... The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial... Continue Reading →

Save Bread~1916

Eat Potatoes. From a group of posters designed by school children. As someone who is deathly allergic to bread, I approve! The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of Congress More Fun Discoveries... Continue Reading →

Wanted: 500 Bakers ~1917

Also 100 Cooks. Alas, 'baker' is no longer a job classification in the military. I'm sure there were several good jokes about the bakery company! The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of... Continue Reading →

WWI Bread Poster ~1917

Help Win the War, Save Bread. The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of Congress More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Election Cake ~1875 Pickles ~1819 Grape Harvest ~2018  

Packing Lunches ~1920

The 1920s Lunchbox. The art of packing lunches has been foremost in my mind recently. Our local recycling company just announced that it would no longer accept plastic bags or plastic wrap of any sort. Now this has been some time coming. California already outlawed cheap plastic grocery bags (Yes, we also banned straws...evil straws.).... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu ~1920

Happy Friday. This is my kind of menu! Just watched Julie & Julia for the umpteenth time. One of my favorites. Fitting to have the Red Star Cooking School advertisement for today's post. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pigeon Season ~1800 Summer Dining ~1897 Currant Wine ~1929

WWII Halloween Menu ~1943

Colorful WWII Halloween Menu. Happy Halloween, everyone! Here's a fascinating Halloween menu from World War II - its purpose was to be festive and improve morale. The chef deliberately chooses foods with fall colors. Notice the mention of rationing and food shortages. Read more about this menu's preparation here. Source: The Evening Star, 1943. More... Continue Reading →

Yuban Business Man 1914

Coffee Monday. Yuban Advertisement. Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Coffee Monday: Malt Coffee 1905 Common Sense Papers on Cookery Overview L’Eau de la Vie Recipe 1837

Friday Menu ~1910

Happy Friday. Source: The Spokane Press, January 22, 1910. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Raspberry Wine ~1810 Fried Quoits~1910 Camping Stoves ~1910

Coffee Monday Yuban Pleasure ~1919

Yuban Advertisement 1919. Has your morning coffee such heart-warming richness of flavor that each day it gives you new cheer, each day a fresh sense of the pleasantness of living? Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Fun Antique Cookbook Titles Domestic Economy and Bliss in 1877 Potato Omelet ~ 1900

Coffee Monday Yuban and Exercise ~1917

Yuban Coffee Advertisement. After exercise, you breath in its steaming fragrance and slowly sip its delicious flavor, at peace with the world... Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries American Domestic Cookery ~1819 Coffee Monday: Washington’s Coffee British Wine Maker and Domestic Brewer Review ~1835  

Friday Menu ~1910

Happy Friday. Source: The Spokane Press, October 17, 1910. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Kitchen Woodcut ~1810 Family Sauce ~1825 Rice Pudding ~1917

October Poem ~1917

Feeling Fall. Source: A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband, c. 1917. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Stock ~1855 Gotham Pudding ~1866 Navigating Antique Cookbooks 101

October Menu ~1884

October Menu. Welcome October! Fall is truly here. This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. This menu is quite the production! From stewed frogs to French fries, there's something for everyone. The poor snipe is featured, again. I'm surprised there... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu ~1910

Three Course Menu Early 1900s. Do we think is a dollar per person for a total of four dollars? Or a dollar for the entire family? Source: The Spokane Press, June 13, 1910. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks To Keep Meat Hot ~1805 Strawberry Wine ~1780 Lightning Tea Cakes ~1917

Pickles ~1819

Preparing for Pickling Season. When I think of a pickling recipe, I think of ingredients. These recipes do their civic duty, however, to warn about poisonous pickling practices. Oh my! Alas, I did not find a good recipe to pickle my green beans in this particular cookbook, so resorted to the WWW. Found this easy... Continue Reading →

Breakfast and Yuban Coffee ~1921

Yuban Advertisement. Coffee Monday. You rejoice in its clear, deep amber color as you pour it out and you notice its strength and richness in the cup - such "body" that the cream curls down into it in lazy, wavering spirals. Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Cape Cod Clam Chowder ~1866 Advice on... Continue Reading →

Grape Harvest ~2018

Harvesting Merlot Grapes. No Gym Membership Needed. Harvesting and processing 200 lbs. of grapes is brutal work. Yesterday started at 6:00 am out in what can only be described as an idyllic vineyard setting. Fog gently receding over the rolling hills covered with oaks the occasional cow. The CA wine grape harvest season is in... Continue Reading →

Mary’s Book Menu ~1910

Three Meal Menu from the 1900s. Happy Friday. Source: The Spokane Press, Aug. 11, 1910. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pigeon Season ~1800 Summer Dining ~1897 Currant Wine ~1929

Feeling Saucy ~1819

6 Sauce Recipes. No parsley? No problem! Off colored meat? No problem! Vive le saucier! Source: American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the use of private families. 1819. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Cream Peppermints ~1897 You Will Slay Them By The Thousand ~1856 I must confess to a weakness for asparagus in... Continue Reading →

Tomato Stuffed with Rice ~1917

Stuffed Tomato Recipe Why aren't there more stuffed tomato recipes? So many people have an aversion to stuffed peppers, maybe they unfairly get lumped into the same taste category? This stuffed tomato recipe is similar to the tomato and egg recipe (1900), but with a heartier twist that can make it a gluten free, vegetarian... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday Yuban ~1920

Yuban Coffee Advertisement. "No matter how tolerant a man may be of his food, he is always critical of the quality of his coffee." Yuban is the unfailing coffee. Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries L’Eau de la Vie Recipe 1837 Coffee Monday: Washington’s Coffee British Wine Maker and Domestic Brewer Review ~1835  

Apple Fritters ~1819

Gluten Free Apple Fritters Recipe. New to fritters, here. Was inspired after watching a cooking show and found a simple apple fritter recipe in American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the use of private families, my current kitchen companion. Here's the pancake recipe. Fritter batter is supposed to be runnier than regular pancake... Continue Reading →

5 Household Cleaning Hints ~1819

Cleaning Tips from the Early 1800s. As you go about your weekend chores, here are some helpful hints to get your work done! From blackening stone chimney-pieces to shoes, American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the use of private families  covers it all! To blacken the fronts of Stone Chimney-pieces. To clean (Silver) Plate.... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu from Donfrio ~1913

Supper Menu from 1913. Happy Friday. Donofrio's Cafe offers many a fine dish, including your Friday fish. Served 5:30 P.M. to 8:30 P.M. Source: The Arizona Republic, Sept. 14, 1913. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pigeon Season ~1800 Summer Dining ~1897 Currant Wine ~1929

Cookery for the Poor ~1819

General Remarks and Frugal Hints. I promise a few hints, to enable every family to assist the poor of their neighbourhood at a very trivial expense; and these may be varied or amended at the discretion of the mistress. This excerpt speaks to the value placed on philanthropy and giving in Victorian homes. I've never... Continue Reading →

Management of Cows ~1819

Running a Dairy in the Early 1800s. Every cookbook should have such a thorough section on livestock management. This excerpt opens a window on the practical aspects of owning a cow. It covers all of the details - from cleanliness, to weaning the calf, to hiring a milking maid. Source: American domestic cookery, formed on principles... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday ~1920

Clear Eyed Businessman. "In every country where the impossible is demanded the American business man is sent for - America's greatest product." I love Yuban adverts. This makes me want to go take on the world. Maybe I'll start by having another cup of coffee, first... Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Cape... Continue Reading →

Jam ~1819

Early 1800s Strawberry Jam. Who doesn't love strawberry jam on Sunday morning waffles? Antique cookbooks can be curious reads - as much for of what they include as what they exclude. I went searching for a strawberry jam recipe hoping to preserve some strawberries for the winter months ahead. Most cookbooks will include a section... Continue Reading →

1920s Menu for Friday

Breakfast, Luncheon, Dinner Menu. Happy Friday. A little menu inspiration from the roaring 20s! This is actually a hearty menu for each of the meals. Included was the recipe for muffins. Source: Rock Island Argus, May 5, 1921. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pigeon Season ~1800 Summer Dining ~1897 Currant Wine ~1929

Rice Edging ~1819

Rice Edging Recipe. Rice is a big staple in our home due to our strict gluten-free diets. Whenever a new rice recipe surfaces, I'm always interested! A side of rice is so blah.  A rice edge? Kind of edgy...  The next time I entertain, I am going to try making a rice edging for my... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday: Edison Electric ~1920

Here Is Your Coffee, Jim. "Thanks, dear; you certainly do make delicious coffee, and I do like it served piping hot, with plenty of cream."   ... Don't the let the fact that you have plenty of servants deprive you of chummy breakfasts. Here's to a chummy Monday! Enjoy! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Thousand... Continue Reading →

Baked Tomatoes ~1819

Early 1800s Baked Tomato Recipe. Here's an easy recipe that celebrates the end-of-summer harvest! Baked tomatoes are one of my favorite side dishes. Ingredients Round tomatoes, cut in half Herbs Salt/Pepper Bake on parchment paper at 350 degrees for 25 minutes. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Not to Blame ~1891 Defining ‘Appetit’ ~ Late... Continue Reading →

September Menu ~1884

September Menu 1884. Welcome September! Where did the summer go? This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. Today's menu features Ox-Cheeck, a la Nelson, fish with a chili sauce (which actually looks delicious - omitting catawba wine), veal, duck, lots... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu ~1910

Happy Friday. How about some fresh raspberries, with cereal and cream, bacon and coffee for breakfast? Sounds good to me! Here's a link to a Roly-Poly Pudding recipe. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pigeon Season ~1800 Summer Dining ~1897 Currant Wine ~1929

American Domestic Cookery ~1819

Introduction. Time for a new cookbook! We finished off The art of cookery made plain and easy, 1805, it was heavy on the meat butchery and dressing of meat. Which I enjoy as much as the next person, but I'm simply not in the position to go out and butcher me a pig... My life is... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday: Green Bag ~1919

Green Bag Coffee Advertisement. Happy Monday! "The coffee they talk about..." More Fun Discoveries L’Eau de la Vie Recipe 1837 Coffee Monday: Washington’s Coffee British Wine Maker and Domestic Brewer Review ~1835  

Bettina’s Spice Cake ~1917

Gluten Free Spice Cake Recipe. When baking spice cake, the entire house feels as if it is wrapped in cinnamon love. Last week's spice cake lasted several days, and was the go-to food for kids rushing out the door for the bus. So, I decided to try a different version - similar, but different. Ingredients... Continue Reading →

Hysterical Water~1805

Hysterical Water Recipe. An entertaining find! Anyone heard of hysterical water? This is a new one for me. Ingredients include, but are not limited to: roots of lovage, mistletoe of the oak, and a quarter pound of dried millipedes. Umm... okay. European mistletoe was toxic. And so is the cyanide in millipedes (alive - I'm... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu ~1913

Yeah! Friday! This is my kind of Friday menu. Some pre-packaged (canned) food makes an appearance because, let's get real, who has the energy to make everything from scratch by the end of the week? Dinner tonight for our family?  Probably frozen pizzas and carrot sticks. Happy Friday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Camping... Continue Reading →

Mysteries of Puddings ~1805

How to Boil Pudding. Today's post answers a question that I've long had about the mystery of boiled puddings. You'll often come across recipes for boiled puddings tied up in cloth, but I could never picture how this functioned practically: If you have a liquid mixture tied in a bag and then placed into a... Continue Reading →

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