Pie Day ~1947

Classic Recipes to Celebrate Pie Day. Happy Pi(e) Day! Here are a few fun pie recipes to help celebrate the day. Mother’s Pumpkin Pie ~1875 Pie or Cobbler? ~1910 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 On Pies ~1855 Thanksgiving Pie “The Crown of the Feast”~1866 Apples Prepared for Nice Pies ~1851  

Friday Menu ~1923

I love this menu - lots of variety! Note the ligheter, meatless dinner. Along with three easy recipes: Doughnuts, Corned Beef Hash, and Maple Wafers.

Mary’s Clam Soup ~1875

5 Ingredients or Less Clam Soup Recipe. Hmm... Maybe just make clams in white sauce? Dispense with the soup label. Looks yummy, but there really isn't much in it other than the clams and the butter fat from the cream. It certainly doesn't qualify as a chowder. This particular clam soup recipe calls for 50... Continue Reading →

Classic Potato Soup ~1875

Handwritten Potato Soup Recipe from the 1870s. Here's a gem! Discovering handwritten recipes from the past neatly tucked into cookbooks is like taking hold of one end of a silk ribbon, the other end traversing a winding path through time to the hand of the original author. And like that, we, dear reader, are connected... Continue Reading →

Easy Celery Soup ~1875

Victorian Era Celery Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! I enjoy cream of celery soup, but have yet to make a truly appetizing plain celery soup. Tried a recipe from Mrs. Beeton's a year or so ago, but evidently didn't post it so must not have been anything special and followed the same principles above.... Continue Reading →

Soup a la Julienne ~1875

Victorian Era Vegetable Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819 Camping Soup ~1910 Stock ~1855

Household Tips ~1923

Advice on Brooms, Bread, and Cake Molds. Eclectic list of household advice from The Neighbor: Keep salt and pepper shaker on the kitchen range. It is handy when seasoning food. (Mine are on top of the microwave). Encircle all new brooms with a section of stocking leg, it will wear longer. A few drops of... Continue Reading →

Ginger Wine Recipe ~1770

How to Make Ginger Wine. Ginger wine is traditionally made from ginger and raisins and first appeared in Britain in the 1740s. The wine can be fortified with brandy or cognac, or even diluted with lemonade. An interesting historical note: There was a widely held belief at the time that ginger wine helped prevent cholera,... Continue Reading →

Celebrating New Year’s Eve Victorian Style.

Dinner. Dancing. Merriment. Starting with dinner. A full menu with oysters, crudités, bass, Hollandaise sauce, melted potatoes, prime beef, Yorkshire pudding, brussel sprouts, stuffed eggplant, a goose, sweet potatoes, celery, beets, mayonnaise, plum pudding with hard sauce, cheese, fruit and coffee. Moving to dancing. To general merriment. Bon-bon parties! Bean bag parties! And oh-so much more! How... Continue Reading →

Pineapple Beer ~1875

Easy Pineapple Beer Recipe. Ever wonder what you can do with the inedible parts of the pineapple? Time for a fizzy drink! This recipe was originally posted a few months back, and I finally had some pineapple remnants to give it a try. The result is a refreshing, lightly-sweetened, non-alcoholic beverage. Mexicans have a similar... Continue Reading →

On Puddings ~1747

3 Classic Recipes for Puddings from the Georgian Era. Today we have three distinct pudding recipes. I'm adding them to the blog as a sort of indexed reminder as I would very much like to come back and try them. The lemons are in season here and I pass several trees tucked away in the... Continue Reading →

A Supper in December ~1770

Georgian Menu and Table Layout. Source: The complete English cook; or, Prudent housewife. Being, a collection of the most general, yet least expensive receipts in every branch of cookery and good housewifery, with directions for roasting, boiling, stewing [etc.] ... together with directions for placing dishes on tables of entertainment: and many other things equally... Continue Reading →

To Re-Cook Cold Turkey ~1881

Leftover Turkey Recipe. Hope all of my readers who celebrate Thanksgiving enjoyed a lovely day! We had the traditional meal here with my folks. Good company, good food, good memories. Of course, one of the side benefits of having a large, traditional feast are the leftovers. It's an excuse to eat that piece of pumpkin... Continue Reading →

Late 1800s Thanksgiving

Classic Thanksgiving Recipes. How about: Chicken Pie, Stuffing, Orange Salad, Corn Pudding, and Banana Fritters? Nice to mix it up from the old turkey and cranberry routine! Still not thrilled with the quality of the images, but the content is there! Turkey Alternative. Stuffing. Sides. Dessert. Source: The Anaconda Standard, 1898. More Fun Discoveries from Antique... Continue Reading →

7 Thanksgiving Menus ~1898

Good Things to Eat on Thanksgiving. Admittedly, the images on these menus are pretty poor. However, this find is such a delight that they just had to be shared. Check out the link below to see the entire page - recipes and all. Too busy changing the sheets for your house guests' imminent arrival? Or... Continue Reading →

Thanksgiving ~1895

I love this image. Incredibly modern, yet technically still in the Victorian period from 1895. Is it turkey time yet?!? Source: The Chap Book, 1895. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Thanksgiving Dinner ~1866 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 Thanksgiving Pie “The Crown of the Feast”~1866

Roast Turkey ~1875

Roasting Turkey. Seven more days until turkey time! This roast turkey recipe is surprisingly detailed. You crush the point of the breast-bone with a rolling pint, serve with curled sausage, and cranberries. I might try rubbing my turkey in an onion. Fun read. Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Inseparable... Continue Reading →

Golden Sunshine Cake ~1914

Easy Golden Sunshine Cake Recipe. The Girl turns 16 today. Wow! How did that happen? Cake time! I thought I had purchased a gluten free cake mix, but discovered that it was, in fact, a pizza mix lurking in the corner of the pantry. Oops. Plan B was to make a golden sunshine cake that... Continue Reading →

Carving ~1875

How to Carve a Turkey Time to ramp up the Thanksgiving holiday cooking-theme. I always thought it was an interesting dichotomy growing up: The Matriarch did the roasting. The Patriarch did the carving. Here was see the gender divide as well. Today? Well, if you're going to fry it in peanut oil, then I'm fine... Continue Reading →

Don’t Waste Bread ~1916

Le Pain. Translation: Our duty is not to waste bread. From a group of posters designed by school children and others, some marked "Affiche composée par les enfants de France pour la prévoyance et les économies." Celebrating the 100th anniversary to the end of WWI. To honor the event, I am sharing several posters under... Continue Reading →

WWI Save Bread Propaganda ~1919

Eat Potatoes. From a group of posters designed by school children. As someone who is deathly allergic to bread, these children largely reflect how I feel in the kitchen... The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial... Continue Reading →

Save Bread~1916

Eat Potatoes. From a group of posters designed by school children. As someone who is deathly allergic to bread, I approve! The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of Congress More Fun Discoveries... Continue Reading →

Wanted: 500 Bakers ~1917

Also 100 Cooks. Alas, 'baker' is no longer a job classification in the military. I'm sure there were several good jokes about the bakery company! The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of... Continue Reading →

WWI Bread Poster ~1917

Help Win the War, Save Bread. The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial Aspects'. Source: Library of Congress More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Election Cake ~1875 Pickles ~1819 Grape Harvest ~2018  

Election Cake ~1875

1879s Election Cake Recipe. Election day here in the US. Time to get your bake on. This recipe is quite involved. Makes 9 loves - plenty to share at the polls! (Find out about measurements here.) In 1875, Ulysses S. Grant was the President of the US; he helped lead the Union to victory over... Continue Reading →

Packing Lunches ~1920

The 1920s Lunchbox. The art of packing lunches has been foremost in my mind recently. Our local recycling company just announced that it would no longer accept plastic bags or plastic wrap of any sort. Now this has been some time coming. California already outlawed cheap plastic grocery bags (Yes, we also banned straws...evil straws.).... Continue Reading →

Happy Greasy Food Day ~1875

Celebrating Doughnut Recipes. Happy National Greasy Food Day! I could have brought you fried eggplant or fried eggs, but opted instead for some doughnuts. Something we can all appreciate with our morning coffee. Time to go grab a dozen for the office on the way to work! A slightly more involved version from Mrs. Boyd.... Continue Reading →

Keeping Cider Sweet ~1875

Preserving Cider. Are we all busy making cider, yet? We have two tubs of apples waiting to be processes - will get to it soon. I was hoping to find a cider recipe, but only found two for preservation. Very surprised at the mustard seed in the first. And for the second, let's just say... Continue Reading →

Mother’s Pumpkin Pie ~1875

Pumpkin Pie Recipe 1870s. Cookbooks back in the day often included blank pages to add your own recipes. I'm not sure when recipe boxes came of fashion, but this method certainly helps keep things all together. Today's post is just such a recipe, written with exquisite penmanship and attributed to Mother. Enjoy! Source: In the... Continue Reading →

Apple Custard ~1881

Apple Custard Recipe 1881 Simple apple custard recipe. Naturally gluten free. I love that it uses the egg custard base - which is the basically the same recipe for cream custard and bread pudding. Ingredients 6 tart apples A little water for stewing Sprinkled white sugar 8 eggs (I would probably do 4-5 large eggs)... Continue Reading →

Feeding a Family for a Week ~1875

A Piece of Roast Beef and a Boiled Leg of Mutton Serve a Small Family for a Week. This particular selection is familiar to me. My go-to meat is a whole chicken, however, mutton being unavailable locally. The Convivial chicken menu looks something like the following: Sunday - Roast whole chicken with rice and peas... Continue Reading →

Aunt Laura’s Breakfast Potatoes ~1875

Victorian Scalloped Potato Recipe. Aunt Laura's Breakfast Potatoes - part recipe, part glimpse at another life in another era. These are some of my favorite discoveries. I sit contemplating whether Aunt Laura would have been happier born 100 years later, pursuing a high-powered managerial career, eating California fusion cuisine delivered by Blue Apron at the... Continue Reading →

Apples! Apples! Apples! ~1875

6 Apple Recipes from the 1870s. Gearing up for apple season. The Girl and The Boy still enjoy going out to the orchards and doing u-pick apples. Something infinitely gratifying about harvesting your own food. Pulled out the dehydrator and making space in the freezer. Located the apple peeler/corer/slicer - ingenious invention. How about some... Continue Reading →

Pineapple Beer ~1875

Easy Pineapple Beer Recipe. Not a big beer fan because, as a rule, it's not gluten free. This recipe seems easy enough. It would hardly be alcoholic if you use it within 24 hours. Maybe that's what makes it a beer instead of a sparkling wine. What I love is that the recipe uses the... Continue Reading →

Fairy Butter ~1875

Fairy Butter Recipe. May your day be filled with the whimsey of fairies, nestled in sugary folds. To be used as icing. Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Tomato Stuffed with Rice ~1917 Preserved Violets ~1890 Lighthouse Kitchen ~1855

Preserving Autumn Leaves ~1875

How to Keep Leaves. Crisp fall day here. Was looking for a cake recipe, and stumbled across this seasonal gem. A little weekend craft time, perhaps? Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Tomato Stuffed with Rice ~1917 Preserved Violets ~1890 Lighthouse Kitchen ~1855

Measurement Conversions ~1875

Understanding Antique Cookbook Measurements. Finally! A clear guide to all of those obscure weights and measures for the Victorian kitchen. From gills, to pecks, to tumblers. Butter the size of an egg has always been a bit of a mystery. #useful Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819... Continue Reading →

Friday Menu ~1913

Yeah! Friday! This is my kind of Friday menu. Some pre-packaged (canned) food makes an appearance because, let's get real, who has the energy to make everything from scratch by the end of the week? Dinner tonight for our family?  Probably frozen pizzas and carrot sticks. Happy Friday! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Camping... Continue Reading →

Spice Cake ~1905

Spice Cake Recipe. This spice cake comes out something like a coffee cake. Not overly sweet and mild. Spice Cake No. 2 looks to be a bit spicier! The raisins are a nice touch. Big hit with The Daughter and The Son. Ingredients 3 cups gluten-free flour, sifted (regular flour if you're so inclined) 2... Continue Reading →

The Daily Menu August ~1914

Happy Friday! Here's a little inspiration for your meals today. When's the last time you made tapioca? It's been well-over a year for our household. Adding it to the grocery list now... More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks War and Potatoes ~1917 Classic: Broiled Salmon ~1922 Household Management: 4 Cultures 1915

Melon Conduciveness ~1904

Eating Melon. The premise is thus: Not all melons are ripe when you cut them open, so to make them edible, first take out a small slice; next, pour in sherry, champagne, or brandy. Replace the slice, rotate the melon gently to make sure the liquor is evenly distributed. Chill. Serve. Cantaloup obviously has a... Continue Reading →

Catchup ~1780

Catchup Recipe. How to make it in the best manner. Today's recipe does not make it into the 5 ingredients or less category. Lots of condiments get labeled as 'ketchup' in antique cookbooks. Chiefly, a mushroom concoction appears by the mid to late 1800s. The recipe below is the first I've seen that: (1) uses... Continue Reading →

Cinderella Birthday Party ~1904

Cinderella Centerpiece. This is a brilliant find, fully deserving of a blog post. Source: New York Tribune, 1904. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Breakfast Inspiration: Poached Eggs on Toast ~1917 Rice and Cheese 1913 How to Choose a Potato ~1855

Macaroni and Cheese ~1897

Macaroni and Cheese Recipe. For all of you macaroni and cheese lovers out there, here's one for you! My nieces are big fans, but this isn't your typical box style mac & cheese... Talk about a unique preparation! The sauce and cheese are layered separately throughout the dish. Here's another macaroni and cheese recipe from... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday: Yuban 1919

Yuban Advertisement. Happy Monday! ...The clever hostess has learned that Yuban fulfills this test as no other coffee does. How much satisfaction it gives you when your guest lifts the fragrant, steaming cup, sips the rich liquid, to see the smile of approval that flits across his face. For the very distinguished guest is especially... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday: Yuban 1914

Yuban Advertisement. Your guests will be quick to appreciate the qualities that make Yuban the choice of the greatest coffee merchants. Happy Monday!   More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Black Bean Soup 1924 Mashed Pumpkin ~1885 September Menu ~1808  

Crust and Lentil Puree Soup ~1825

Potage de Croûte a la Purée. Prep. Time: 5 min Cook Time: 20 min Serves: 4 Ingredients: 2 cups lentils 6 - 10 cups broth 4 slices bread/ 2 cups bread crusts 1/2 cup meat drippings (chicken) Pre-heat oven 350°. Step 1: Place the drippings in the bottom of an oven-safe tureen. Put the bread... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday: Yuban 1921

Yuban Advertisements. Happy Monday! And then... Pancakes and coffee - such coffee. It was hard to tell which warmed the heart more, the coffee or the Southern hospitality. It took several butlers and many covered dishes to serve breakfast at Aunt Letty's on Drive, but her coffee was her pride - its preparation was a... Continue Reading →

Vegetable Fritters ~1893

Vegetable Fritter Recipes. Cucumber Fritters - I'm not so sure about this. I never think of cooking cucumbers. Pea Fritters  Beet Fritters The beet recipe is involved, but has potential for some interesting flavors. I think the beet/onion patty would have a tendency to fall apart when frying - at least in my kitchen. Cymling... Continue Reading →

Potatoes with Verjuice ~1825

Pommes de Terre au Verjus - French Style Recipe. Here's a very contemporary-looking recipe for potatoes with verjuice. One can never have too many potato dishes in one's back pocket. This particular recipe comes from a cookbook for those of "moderate fortune" - meaning you will find recipes with meat, fish, wine, herbs, sugar, etc.... Continue Reading →

Cream Peppermints ~1897

Cream Peppermints Recipe Tis the season when cooks begin to break out their cookie and candy recipes for gift exchanges! This Cream Peppermint recipe is as straightforward as it gets. Ingredients 2 cups powder sugar 6 Tbsp. water 1/4 tsp. cream of targer 1/2 tsp. essence of peppermint More Fun Discoveries Risot a la Piemontaise... Continue Reading →

Apple Jam ~ 1876

Apple Jam Recipe Ingredients: Brown sugar Sour apples (pared, cored, chopped fine) Grated rind of 2 lemons White ginger Note: The ginger is essential to its peculiar excellence (which I think is a unique taste twist!) More Fun Discoveries Rich Baked Apple Pudding ~1890 Apples Prepared for Nice Pies ~1851 Coffee Monday: French Coffee and... Continue Reading →

Potato Puff Balls ~1941

Always looking for ways to re-purpose mashed potatoes...'Potato Puff Balls' sounded so perfect, I just had to give this one a try. This recipe comes from a condensed pamphlet entitled 250 Ways of Serving Potatoes (Culinary Arts Institute, 1941) - containing everything from baked potatoes, to potato salad, to potato puff balls! One note: Mashed... Continue Reading →

Risot a la Piemontaise ~1844

A simple delicious risotto! You'll need five ingredients: Italian rice (arborio) Butter One onion Broth Parmesan I think of something like a Parmesan risotto as a more modern dish. Nope. Not at all. Folks were enjoying risotto 150 years ago! More Fun Discoveries Satisfaction in Repast: Judicious Selection and Perfect Cookery Chocolate and a Mysterious... Continue Reading →

Jelly Fritters ~1866

Ingredients: 2 Eggs 1 Pint Milk 1 Pint Wheat Flour - or more 1 Tablespoonful Lard 1 Saltspoonful of Salt 1 Doyle (Doily) Dessertspoonful of Firm Jelly or Jam Question: When was the last time you used the word doily? More Delightful Discoveries Cures: Teething, Scurvy, Rattlesnakes, Etc. ~1856 Maccaroni, with Cheese ~1881 A Slow... Continue Reading →

Spinning Sugar ~1886

So I'm not sure if this holds with the practical of Miss Corson's Practical American Cookery, but... Check out this wonderful Victorian image of spinning sugar - slightly intimidating for the home cook. In fact, probably don't try this at home. Also, note the handlebar on this gentleman! Very, very dapper indeed! More Fun Discoveries... Continue Reading →

Whortleberry Fried-Cakes ~1886

What, you are probably asking yourself, is a whortleberry? Well, I'm glad you did asked. Other names include: bilberry and lingonberry. The name huckleberry is derived from whortleberry (Huckle/Whortle - I suppose I see the similarity). Whortleberries are often confused with blueberries. Blueberries were cultivated from hybrids only about 100 years ago, which I did... Continue Reading →

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