Wednesday Wisdom: The Art of Cooking

The great aim of all cooking is to retain all the valuable elements of the food, and to put them into such forms as shall awake desire, stimulate digestion, and secure to the eater, in the readiest and most pleasing way, all the nutriment these viands afford.

Coffee Monday: Frothed Cafe au Lait

Today's recipe comes from the New England Cook Book, by Marion Harland, Miss M. Parloa, Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, ad Thomas J. Murrey, 1905. This Frothed Cafe au Lait recipe uses whipped egg whites and powdered sugar. It seems almost decadent compared to our modern steemed milk today! Delicious.

Nutritional Essentials 1941

Dietary sciences would have taken off during WWI. The average daily household nutritional intake below is quite different than what's recommended today, but surprisingly modest by any account. Excellent guidelines: Sweets - enough to make meals palatable. They only have 2 servings of breads and cereals, which is remarkably balanced. What stands out to you?... Continue Reading →

Eggs 1916

Eggs! Here's a fun introductory excerpt on all things eggs for your reading pleasure. Also including a recipe for baked omelet, which is new way to cook omelets. Note that this comes from the Crisco cookbook (more on that in a later post). Crisco! They snuck it in there as the first, all-important ingredient. There... Continue Reading →

January Weekly Menu 1860s

Bills of Fare for January: Plain Family Dinners The astounding variety in each of these dinner menus makes the reader wonder what a fancy dinner would look like! Of note, our family enjoys apple sauce. We should eat it as a side dish. Check out the cabinet pudding recipe, similar to the one included in... Continue Reading →

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