To Dry Artichoke Bottoms 1808

Artichokes are timeless. Their savory flavor always a delicacy on their own, in sauces, or dips. The problem is, however, that their season is so short. Living in Coastal California, you can stop at the roadside stands and pick up bags of little artichokes for a screaming deal - 10/$1, and even the medium sized…

Advice on Mushroom Foraging ~1866

For all of you mycologists and mycophagists out there, how reliable are these general guidelines for mushroom foraging? Does this spell certain death? Or will we, the gentle reader, be enjoying a lovely sauteed mushroom repast? Leave your comments below! More Fun Discoveries Eating an Artichoke ~1886 The Well-trained Mary Jane & No Greenery-Yallery ~1893…

Eating an Artichoke ~1886

Artichokes have a special place in our family. Until a few years ago, we lived outside of Castroville, CA, the self-proclaimed artichoke capital of the world. Every year, they sponsored the artichoke festival, in which they showcased artichoke art, artichoke recipes, a parade, and tours of the artichoke fields. And lots of tacos and mariachi…

Dandelion Salad ~1844

Ah, spring is finely here! We passed a yard the other day and it was covered with dandelions. Inspiration struck! We gathered our paring knives and headed out to the yard for a mini foraging expedition. Dandelion recipes are found in just about every circa 1800s cookbook I've ever read. Most common are the boiled…

Boiled Celery Recipe ~1886

What a perfect celery pyramid! Originally from the Mediterranean region, humans have cultivated celery for thousands of years. Here in the U.S., we typically only eat the stalks and leaves. I had never thought of cooking and serving the ends of celery (wait, they're called the 'heads'...). Typically the ends go to our pet rabbits…