Tomato Chowder ~1922

Quick and Savory Tomato Soup. Gluten Free Recipe from the 1920s. This tomato chowder recipe calls for fat, which makes for a savory soup worthy of the coldest February day. I threw all of the ingredients into the slow cooker and put it on high for 4 hours. Turned out great. Servings: 6 Prep Time:... Continue Reading →

Mary’s Clam Soup ~1875

5 Ingredients or Less Clam Soup Recipe. Hmm... Maybe just make clams in white sauce? Dispense with the soup label. Looks yummy, but there really isn't much in it other than the clams and the butter fat from the cream. It certainly doesn't qualify as a chowder. This particular clam soup recipe calls for 50... Continue Reading →

Classic Potato Soup ~1875

Handwritten Potato Soup Recipe from the 1870s. Here's a gem! Discovering handwritten recipes from the past neatly tucked into cookbooks is like taking hold of one end of a silk ribbon, the other end traversing a winding path through time to the hand of the original author. And like that, we, dear reader, are connected... Continue Reading →

Easy Celery Soup ~1875

Victorian Era Celery Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! I enjoy cream of celery soup, but have yet to make a truly appetizing plain celery soup. Tried a recipe from Mrs. Beeton's a year or so ago, but evidently didn't post it so must not have been anything special and followed the same principles above.... Continue Reading →

Soup a la Julienne ~1875

Victorian Era Vegetable Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819 Camping Soup ~1910 Stock ~1855

Classic Mulligatawney ~1875

Mulligatawny Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Mulligatawny is an English soup recipe that probably crossed into British cuisine during the colonial period. It is a curry-style soup... Continue Reading →

Christmas Turkey ~1855

Boiled Turkey and Gravy Recipe. This recipe is taken from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people.  The cooking method is ingenious, as it's a one-pot Christmas dinner. Included: stuffing, gravy, and soup! I love that it adds bacon to the pot for both salt and flavor. Has anyone tried boiling a whole turkey? I may have... Continue Reading →

Feeding a Family for a Week ~1875

A Piece of Roast Beef and a Boiled Leg of Mutton Serve a Small Family for a Week. This particular selection is familiar to me. My go-to meat is a whole chicken, however, mutton being unavailable locally. The Convivial chicken menu looks something like the following: Sunday - Roast whole chicken with rice and peas... Continue Reading →

Pigeon Season ~1800

Pigeon Recipes. "A pig and a pigeon should never be cold." Pigeons pair with vegetables, French beans, asparagus, and cucumber. Boiled! Broiled! Yum! Source: The New London Cookery and Complete Domestic Guide, 1800. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Macaroni and Cheese ~1897 Kitchen Woodcut ~1810 Rice Pudding ~1917

Habits of Economy ~1800

Gravy, Broth, or Soup. Do you save your drippings? If so, what do you use them for? Here's an excerpt on saving drippings and broths to make soup and collect grease for frying. In our household, I save chicken drippings for soup all of the time. Here's the most recent addition: You can see the... Continue Reading →

Skilligalee ~1910

Skilly Camping Soup Recipe. Early 1900s Camping Recipes. Today's post is as much a feast of colorful vocabulary as it is one of food. I can't easily find the origin of skilligalee, but it comes up as a thin broth or porridge, quite the opposite of the description below. There's a fabulous thread about it... Continue Reading →

Camping Soup ~1910

Recipe for Soup Making while Camping. Notes on Soup Making. Any soup fans out there? We're big soup people in my home. Usually made out of weekend leftovers of some sort prepared in the slow cooker and smelling like heaven after a day at work. Today's post has a longer excerpt because it is (1)... Continue Reading →

Fannie Farmer Cream of Tomato Soup

Homemade Tomato Soup. Attempt #1. CAUTION: Do not make this recipe as described below. Soup is big in our household, and I wanted to give this one a try. Canned tomato soup is fine, but what if you could make your own tomato soup? The fact that this recipe uses canned tomatoes is besides the... Continue Reading →

Stock ~1855

Simple Stock Recipe. I'm exploring Soyer's shilling cookery for the people. The author has an absolutely delightful writing style, writing the book in a correspondence style to Eloise. Here's the introduction to soup: And here's the first lesson for Stock for Clear Soup: More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Potato Omelet ~ 1900 Risot a la... Continue Reading →

Crust and Lentil Puree Soup ~1825

Potage de Croûte a la Purée. Prep. Time: 5 min Cook Time: 20 min Serves: 4 Ingredients: 2 cups lentils 6 - 10 cups broth 4 slices bread/ 2 cups bread crusts 1/2 cup meat drippings (chicken) Pre-heat oven 350°. Step 1: Place the drippings in the bottom of an oven-safe tureen. Put the bread... Continue Reading →

Samp ~1847

Corn Husk Porridge. Samp is a new one for me. Our friend Wikipedia writes that samp is the corn kernels which are removed and ground into the dish. This recipe clearly describes the husk and skin of the corn proper... Now, this recipe comes from a book called: Cheap receipts and hints on cookery; collected for... Continue Reading →

Black Bean Soup 1924

Black Bean Soup Recipe. Black bean soup has that reputation for being a hearty, soul-filling soup. In our household, black bean soup usually comes in a can (slightly embarrassing confession for a blog about home cooking). This recipe comes from Fannie Farmer's famous Boston School of Cooking book, once again. My edition is circa 1924... Continue Reading →

Perfect Lunch Menu

Tomato Soup, Omelet, Bananas Something about this menu just seems perfect: Tomato soup with croutons Veggie omelet Bread and butter Bananas Tea Just had to share! Source: Fannie Farmer, 1924. (That's an affiliate link 🙂 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Fun Antique Cookbook Titles Cooking as Noble Science ~1897 Orange Salad ~1855

Soup for the Poor ~1847

Hearty Soup Recipe. Winter! When will it end? Here's a hearty vegetarian winter soup recipe to keep the frost at bay. Peameal refers to ground yellow peas. This would be used to coat pork tips. In this case, however, it's probably just referring to the peas. I don't use oats in my soups. Nor do... Continue Reading →

Cape Cod Clam Chowder ~1866

Mid-1800s Cape Cod Clam Chowder Recipe. Whenever I make clam chowder, it always seems really involved. I love this recipe because you fry the salt pork, layer the ingredients, and then let it cook. Simple! Note the absence of cream/milk. Ingredients Salt pork (bacon or breakfast ham) Crackers (or Gluten free bread in my house)... Continue Reading →

December Menu ~1884

December Menu Late 1800s. Welcome December! This bill of fare for 8 people includes giblet soup, broiled eels and potatoes, veal, turkey liver, and glazed apples. A hearty winter meal. This menu and recipe set comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book (1844). The book is unique because it is organized around menus for each day... Continue Reading →

"There is no dish, perhaps, that comes to the table which gives such general satisfaction as well prepared soup." My children would agree! This is a wonderful introduction on the topic of making soup. There are so many little bits of advice throughout. For example, I didn't know that skimming soup when it first boils... Continue Reading →

What to Do with Pigs’ Feet? Stew Them!

Every once in a while, you run across pigs' feet in the meat section of the store. Certainly a curiosity, but never a possibility...until today! Note: Gravy here refers to a broth thickened with rice flour. Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall, 1856. Discover More.

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