Feeding a Family for a Week ~1875

How a Piece of Roast Beef and a Boiled Leg of Mutton May Serve a Small Family for a Week. This particular selection is familiar to me. My go-to meat is a whole chicken, however, mutton being unavailable locally. The Convivial chicken menu looks something like the following: Sunday - Roast whole chicken with rice... Continue Reading →

October Menu ~1884

October Menu. Welcome October! Fall is truly here. This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. This menu is quite the production! From stewed frogs to French fries, there's something for everyone. The poor snipe is featured, again. I'm surprised there... Continue Reading →

September Menu ~1884

September Menu 1884. Welcome September! Where did the summer go? This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. Today's menu features Ox-Cheeck, a la Nelson, fish with a chili sauce (which actually looks delicious - omitting catawba wine), veal, duck, lots... Continue Reading →

To Keep Meat Hot ~1805

Clever Cooking Tip. Brilliant way of keeping meat hot without drying it out. I've certainly had meat from restaurants that could have employed some method akin to that described above. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Derby Time! Mint Julep ~1886 Gridirons ~1855 War and Potatoes ~1917 Source: The art of cookery made plain and... Continue Reading →

Pigeon Season ~1800

Pigeon Recipes. "A pig and a pigeon should never be cold." Pigeons pair with vegetables, French beans, asparagus, and cucumber. Boiled! Broiled! Yum! Source: The New London Cookery and Complete Domestic Guide, 1800. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Macaroni and Cheese ~1897 Kitchen Woodcut ~1810 Rice Pudding ~1917

Habits of Economy ~1800

Gravy, Broth, or Soup. Do you save your drippings? If so, what do you use them for? Here's an excerpt on saving drippings and broths to make soup and collect grease for frying. In our household, I save chicken drippings for soup all of the time. Here's the most recent addition: You can see the... Continue Reading →

Snits and Knepp ~1910

Snits and Knepp Recipe. Any snits un knepp fans out there? The above recipe comes from the 1910 Horace Kephart book, Camp Cookery. It is, after the fashion of so many early recipes collections, a little sparse on the details. Wikipedia comes in handy with the following description: Schnitz un knepp, often spelled schnitz un gnepp,... Continue Reading →

Chili Meat 1938

Sunset Chili Recipe. Today's recipe comes from a fun cookbook, a 1938 Sunset Kitchen Cabinet Cook Book. All of the margins include cartoons detailing the steps in the recipe. Here's the one for chili: I always enjoy compilation cookbooks, where the contributors submit recipes and then sign off on the bottom - gives recipes a... Continue Reading →

Possum Recipe ~1910

Possum Recipe for Camping. This is the first time I have ever come across a possum recipe. Ever. Which is saying something. Note that he is to be served with sweet potatoes - except in desperate extremity. Read on!The details...   Brace yourself for this next paragraph - explicit historical and cultural reference pervade. Anyone... Continue Reading →

July Menu ~1884

July Menu 1884. Welcome July! This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year (Check out last July's menu, here). Here's to summer! This is a truly seasonal menu, you find a vegetable soup with asparagus and carrots, boiled artichokes, and raspberry ice-cream.... Continue Reading →

Butchery ~1807

Kitchen Knives, etc. Back to the kitchen for today's post! Saw these and thought the illustrations were fascinating, in a macabre kind of way. I'm familiar with larding needles and meat cleavers, but a cutlet bat is a new one. Additional instruments for the home cook: meat saw, chopping boards, basins, and knives. From a... Continue Reading →

June Menu ~1884

June Menu 1884. Welcome June! This month's menu comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year (Check out last June's menu, here). Here's to summer! This Garbure a la Clermont looks delicious - something akin to a French onion soup, which makes sense given that... Continue Reading →

May Menu ~1884

May Menu 1884. Welcome May! This month's menu again comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. Here's to spring! The prawn sauce looks delicious! Sirloin of Beef: That is a lot of beef for 8 people. More Fun Menus from Antique Cookbooks April... Continue Reading →

Cottage Cooking ~1855

Victorian Domestic Economy.   For those readers who enjoy peeking into the past, this excerpt offers a wonderful view of family life in a English cottage circa 1850. You have a multi-generational home, picky eaters, and a glimpse at food prices. Fascinating. Enjoy! Have a wonderful day! Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855.... Continue Reading →

Bubble and Squeak ~1855

Corned Beef and Cabbage. Being of Irish surname name, I have had many (many) conversations over the course of my life about St. Patrick's Day traditions. Specifically, several people have shared (repeatedly) how corned beef and cabbage isn't actually an Irish 'thing'. Well, all of those people were right. Insofar as it was not called... Continue Reading →

Curious Effects of Imagination ~1855

On Imagination and Food. Check on these next two stories from Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, circa 1855. Alexis was a formidable woman expressing self-confidence, wit, and irreverence. Enjoy! She actually has a point on that last part. Now we turn to politics, however... Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries from... Continue Reading →

Mutton Chops ~1855

Mutton Chop Recipe. In my opinion... Love how this recipe is written! As someone in the language business, this first sentence is fabulous. I should pass it along to my daughter's high school English teacher so that the class can practice sentence diagraming - a fine, under appreciated skill. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the... Continue Reading →

Lamb ~1855

  On Lamb. Soyer's shilling cookery for the people  is a gift on every page. Here's a little smile to start your day. On lamb... The book treats us to one (1) simple recipe for lamb: More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks How Funny We Feel ~1831 Orange Salad ~1855 Pumpkin Diet Drink ~1885

Curing Ham ~1855

How to Cure Ham. Another gem from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people, this one on the essential skill of curing ham. Even if you don't think that you'll ever need to cure your own ham, this excerpt is immensely entertaining. Enjoy! Anyone who can work in mummification into a cookbook has a gift for written imagery!... Continue Reading →

April Menu ~1884

April Menu 1884. Welcome April! This month's menu again comes from the Franc-American Cookery Book; Or, how to live well and eat wisely every day of the year. The puree of asparagus looks fantastic! Let us take a moment to appreciate the food processor and blender. Mashing asparagus through a sieve would so not be... Continue Reading →

Stewed Squirrels Recipe ~1886

Squirrel Recipe. In honor of National Squirrel Appreciation Day, a token recipe for our furry friends! What I love about this recipe is that it is written in the plural, so we know that the cook would be preparing multiples of squirrels for the meal. Coming from the squirrel-obsessed towns of Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, this is... Continue Reading →

To Choose and Prepare Crabs ~1881

To Choose and Prepare Crabs. Thinking about crab for the New Year feast? Here are some general considerations. Oddly enough, the actual preparation of removing the meat and mixing it with oil, vinegar, salt and pepper, and cayenne pepper - then placing it back in the shell - was how it was prepared when I... Continue Reading →

December Menu ~1844

December Menu - Welcome December! This bill of fare for 8 people includes giblet soup, broiled eels and potatoes, veal, turkey liver, and glazed apples. A hearty winter meal. This menu and recipe set comes from the Franco-American Cookery Book (1844). The book is unique because it is organized around menus for each day of... Continue Reading →

Jellied Turkey ~1897

Jellied Turkey Recipe Still looking for turkey leftover recipes? This one is a stretch for the modern palate. A savory jelly made out of stock and gelatin with bits of meat added to it (just like the red jello with grapes in it - only different). More Fun Discoveries Turkey Scalloped 1881 To Carve Roast... Continue Reading →

How the President Carves Turkey ~1889

How the President Carves Turkey Give me that gobbler brown and luscious! A literary masterpiece! Just in case you missed it, Harrison carves the turkey at the table (not in the kitchen). More Fun Discoveries Directions for Setting Refreshment Tables ~1866 Apple Jam ~ 1876 Coffee Custard ~1905 Source: St. Paul Daily Globe, 1889.

To Carve Roast Turkey ~1886

  How to Carve a Turkey Ah, the 1 day a year when you get to wield your knives in an unwieldy fashion. Fear not! Your trusty Practical American Cookery book has your back and gives step-by-step instructions on how to carve the Thanksgiving turkey.If you look really closely, you can see the dotted lines... Continue Reading →

Turkey Scalloped 1881

Turkey Scalloped Got leftovers? This is a spinoff of the turkey pie you would make with mashed potatoes. Instead of potatoes, layer a dish with breadcrumbs, a little milk, turkey, dressing, butter, and gravy. The final layer is a mixture of 2 eggs, milk, melted butter, and cracker crumbs in a thick, spreadable paste on... Continue Reading →

Pork Butchery ~1856

The pork loins are cut into the pieces as scored by the butcher!   More Fun Discoveries Army Slap-Jacks ~1886 Flossie on Hospitality ~1904 Grape-Fruit For Breakfast ~1886 Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, 1856, EM. Hall.  

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