Beef Loaf ~1904

It turns out that meatloaf is not a relic of the 1940s...Who knew? Note: For the careful reader, you'll find that the recipe is truncated. No, the recipe doesn't continue somewhere else in the paper. Talk about your 100 year-old cliffhanger! You'll just have to wing-it. My advice? Smother your beef loaf in ketchup and…

On Oysters and Chicken Salad ~1889

Mrs. Matthews, whose dinners have always been known as the most recherché of that gastronomic circle known as the supreme court, says that the Lynn Havens are the best of the American bivalves... Note: Recherché is exotic, rare, or esoteric. This is a fabulous line. One of the customs of the day was to solicit…

Corn Pudding ~1905

This recipe comes from a newspaper column entitled "The Home Department". Readers write in requests for certain recipes or household tips and then other readers respond. Of course, this means that there's a delay in getting the information out. Hence the introductory parens...and enter the niche market for Pinterest some 100+ years later. Source: The…

History of Aunt Jemima ~1919

This is a fascinating advertisement. A full page story within a story. The margins have small excerpts with their own narrative (Note the sack of 'Gold' on the table): The main story is two full columns: Interestingly, if the storyline is correct, all of this would have started around 1859. It references the Civil War,…

Fried Peaches ~1866

We once lived in a house with a scraggly peach tree in the backyard. Each year, I would pick the peaches when they were still not quite ripe in order to save them from the birds. We used them for peach jam. This recipe for under ripe fried peaches would have been delicious! Hopefully a…

Dried Peaches ~1866

This recipe is interesting because it also offers insight into the daily lives of our cooks. They cut the fruit up in the morning and leave it in the sunshine all day. Then when the baking is done, they move the fruit into the oven. I recall hearing once that 6-7 hours/day was spent cooking…

To Make Lemonade ~1866

All of the details in this recipe are simply delightful, from dollar-piece lemon wedges to crushed raspberries and strawberries. The kids could make some sidewalk money with this one, guaranteed! Welcome Summer! More Fun Discoveries Mrs. Madison’s Whim ~1866 Army Slap-Jacks ~1886 You Will Slay Them By The Thousand ~1856 Source: Mrs. Crowen's American Lady's…

Wine Sangree ~1866

This is not the familiar sangria recipe that we think of today with fruit, and I'm not sure if the two are related, though it seems likely. The sangree recipes that I've come across all call for port or Madeira with the addition of sugar and spices. Both of these fortified wines would be better…