Everywoman’s Cook Book Introduction ~1922

National League Cookbook. New day! New cookbook! This little book is only about 50 pages long - publicized as being a Service for Women from the National League of out San Francisco. Introduction and Table of Contents follow. Note the popular reference to Fannie Farmer. Table of Contents Source: Everywoman's Cook Book, 1922. More Fun... Continue Reading →

Measurement Conversions ~1875

Understanding Antique Cookbook Measurements. Finally! A clear guide to all of those obscure weights and measures for the Victorian kitchen. From gills, to pecks, to tumblers. Butter the size of an egg has always been a bit of a mystery. #useful Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819... Continue Reading →

The Table ~1875

Victorian Table Etiquette. The Silent Educator. No silent educator in the household has higher rank than the table. Surrounded three times a day by the family, who gather from their various callings and duties, eager for refreshment of body and spirit... Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819... Continue Reading →

American Domestic Cookery ~1819

Introduction. Time for a new cookbook! We finished off The art of cookery made plain and easy, 1805, it was heavy on the meat butchery and dressing of meat. Which I enjoy as much as the next person, but I'm simply not in the position to go out and butcher me a pig... My life is... Continue Reading →

Give Us This Day ~1800

Gastronomic Library Bookplate. Happy Sunday! The household is recovering from the various ailments of man attributable to children and their love of sharing germs, so the blog is a little slow. Here's a lovely bookplate from the Katherine Golden Bitting gastronomy collection at the Library of Congress "Give us this day our daily bread" --... Continue Reading →

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