March ~1917

Poem from Bettina. March is upon us, one of the more challenging months. Here's a short poem from the wonderfully entertaining A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband that expresses all. Weary are we of winter-time fare; Hasten, O Springtime, elusive and arch! Bring us your danties, our cupboards are bare! Pitty us! Starved by... Continue Reading →

Five Food Principles

Framework for an Early Food Pyramid. Or My Plate, they both work. This excerpt comes from the book Practical Cooking and Serving, 1902. As you read through it, you'll notice that the author has a very scientific orientation towards cooking. We're moving into an era when cooking becomes a science to be understood and mastered.... Continue Reading →

A Lesson on Beef ~1902

Cows in Old Cookbooks. Moo. Let beeves and home-bred kine partake The sweets of Burn-Mill meadow. - Wordsworth By the time we move into the late 1800s and early 1900s, cookbooks have settled into some predictable patterns. Chapters are mostly divided into the type of dish being served, for example cakes or soups, or the... Continue Reading →

Kitchen Design ~1827

1800s Kitchens.For your leisurely Sunday consumption, I offer you these remarks on the Victorian kitchen:It is an undisputed fact, that no person can work without tools; and in proportion to the completeness and fitness of the tools furnished, labour is facilitated, and a more perfect performance may be expected. These remarks apply, in no small... Continue Reading →

The New London Cookery ~1827

Frugality. Comfort. Elegance. Title page and frontispiece from the New London Cookery Book. Lovely. And... Numerous Useful Miscellaneous Receipts. Source: New London Cookery, By A Lady, 1827. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks The Farmer’s Wife Introduction ~1780 Summer Luncheon Menu ~1913 Household Finances ~1819  

Cookbook Subscribers ~1747

How Books Were Printed in the 1700s. Looking for Character Names? In the Introduction to The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy (1747), written by A Lady, the authoress includes a list of names of subscribers. Here's what the interwebs have to say about subscribers, credit to U Penn Library for writing about the... Continue Reading →

Helps for Housekeepers ~1922

National League Cookbook. Lots of good tips here - from salting to searing. Any that you would add? Source: Everywoman's Cook Book, 1922. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Rice and Cheese 1913 What To Do With Stale Bread ~1897 Domestic Economy and Bliss in 1877

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