December’s Kitchen Garden ~1744

Welcome December! Are we dreaming of summer yet? Digressing slightly from the usual practice of posting a monthly menu on the first day of the new month, and instead offering a companion gardner for December from Adam's Luxury and Eve's Cookery. The book includes a monthly to-do section for your kitchen garden, which I find... Continue Reading →

Packing Lunches ~1920

The Lunchbox. The art of packing lunches has been foremost in my mind recently. Our local recycling company just announced that it would no longer accept plastic bags or plastic wrap of any sort. Now this has been some time coming. California already outlawed cheap plastic grocery bags (Yes, we also banned straws...evil straws.). Stores... Continue Reading →

Helps for Housekeepers ~1922

National League Cookbook. Lots of good tips here - from salting to searing. Any that you would add? Source: Everywoman's Cook Book, 1922. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Rice and Cheese 1913 What To Do With Stale Bread ~1897 Domestic Economy and Bliss in 1877

Feeding a Family for a Week ~1875

How a Piece of Roast Beef and a Boiled Leg of Mutton May Serve a Small Family for a Week. This particular selection is familiar to me. My go-to meat is a whole chicken, however, mutton being unavailable locally. The Convivial chicken menu looks something like the following: Sunday - Roast whole chicken with rice... Continue Reading →

Household Tips for Tuesday ~1875

5 Helpful Hints for the Home. A fun read, including "a most beautiful application of the science of chemistry." I just can't figure out what the first one is for... What are we leaching? Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Potage au Choux ~1825 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 The Housewife... Continue Reading →

The Table ~1875

The Silent Educator. No silent educator in the household has higher rank than the table. Surrounded three times a day by the family, who gather from their various callings and duties, eager for refreshment of body and spirit... Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819 Pastry Rules ~1917... Continue Reading →

5 Household Cleaning Hints ~1819

As you go about your weekend chores, here are some helpful hints to get your work done! From blackening stone chimney-pieces to shoes, American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the use of private families  covers it all! To blacken the fronts of Stone Chimney-pieces. To clean (Silver) Plate. Note the reference to mercury as... Continue Reading →

Management of Cows ~1819

Running a Dairy. Every cookbook should have such a thorough section on livestock management. This excerpt opens a window on the practical aspects of owning a cow. It covers all of the details - from cleanliness, to weaning the calf, to hiring a milking maid. Source: American domestic cookery, formed on principles of economy, for the... Continue Reading →

Mysteries of Puddings ~1805

How to Boil Pudding. Today's post answers a question that I've long had about the mystery of boiled puddings. You'll often come across recipes for boiled puddings tied up in cloth, but I could never picture how this functioned practically: If you have a liquid mixture tied in a bag and then placed into a... Continue Reading →

To Keep Meat Hot ~1805

Clever Cooking Tip. Brilliant way of keeping meat hot without drying it out. I've certainly had meat from restaurants that could have employed some method akin to that described above. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Derby Time! Mint Julep ~1886 Gridirons ~1855 War and Potatoes ~1917 Source: The art of cookery made plain and... Continue Reading →

Habits of Economy ~1800

Gravy, Broth, or Soup. Do you save your drippings? If so, what do you use them for? Here's an excerpt on saving drippings and broths to make soup and collect grease for frying. In our household, I save chicken drippings for soup all of the time. Here's the most recent addition: You can see the... Continue Reading →

Butchery ~1807

Kitchen Knives, etc. Back to the kitchen for today's post! Saw these and thought the illustrations were fascinating, in a macabre kind of way. I'm familiar with larding needles and meat cleavers, but a cutlet bat is a new one. Additional instruments for the home cook: meat saw, chopping boards, basins, and knives. From a... Continue Reading →

How To Set The Luncheon Table ~1899

The Victorian Lunch Table. Love the early photography in this one! The directions for setting the luncheon table will not be familiar. Take a look at the picture itself, then the directions below. You'll notice multiple forks and knives. I really like the little tea kettle set-up in the center of the table. When did... Continue Reading →

The Outdoors Meal ~1915

Are you a devotee of outdoors eating? Three day weekend here in the US that officially kicks off BBQ season. This find seems appropriately timed. "If you have a country home with verandas, garden and lawns, try to have at least two meals out-of-doors each day." The outdoors meal may be as simple or as... Continue Reading →

Random Household Hints ~1886

Household Hints. Ever wonder about: boiling coffee, cleaning your stovepipe, making glue for mounting ferns and seaweed, slicing pineapple, and mashing potatoes? Quite the collection! Enjoy! Source: Abbeville Messenger, 1886. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Garlic ~1885 Fried Cauliflower ~1887 Rice and Cheese 1913

Small Kitchen Stove Advertisement ~1855

Apparatus for Heating, Cooking, and Ventilating by Gas. Description. The more economical cousin of the deluxe gas stove shown here, this must-have kitchen apparatus will roast meat, bake a pie, and heat your soup all at once! Love it! Unsure as to how the ironing would happen here... but still, amazing little gas stove! Source:... Continue Reading →

Victorian Gas Stove Advertisement ~1855

Apparatus for Heating, Cooking, and Ventilating by Gas. Description. Check out this baby! Decorative and functional! For those who need an endorsement, how about Her Majesty's Royal Letters Patent? An apparatus worthy the attention of Men of Science, and the Culinary Art... Extra Credit for incorporating the word PERNICIOUS in an advertisement! Source: Soyer's Shilling... Continue Reading →

Alarum Clock ~1855

Alarm Clock - New Kitchen Invention. No microwave timer? No smartphone alarm? No problem! Check out this newest and most handiest of inventions, the alarum, or cooking clock. (Alarum is the British spelling) Note the N.B. - If the fire isn't the correct temperature, the alarm clock will not serve much of a purpose. Makes... Continue Reading →

Cottage Kitchen ~1855

Victorian Kitchen Necessities. A brief overview of what our kitchens would have if we were to set up house in 1855.     A visual, if you please:   What's missing for you? I would need a coffee pot. Maybe a few more bowls. Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855. More Fun Discoveries... Continue Reading →

Cottage Cooking ~1855

Victorian Domestic Economy.   For those readers who enjoy peeking into the past, this excerpt offers a wonderful view of family life in a English cottage circa 1850. You have a multi-generational home, picky eaters, and a glimpse at food prices. Fascinating. Enjoy! Have a wonderful day! Source: Soyer's Shilling Cookery for the People, 1855.... Continue Reading →

Gridirons ~1855

Gridiron. Another great excerpt from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people! Here's everything you need to know about gridirons: I couldn't find a photo of the hanging wire gridiron. I found what looks like a hanging flat griddle, but that's not what is described above. If anyone knows more about this one, please pass it along in... Continue Reading →

Rainy Days ~1866

Rainy Day Advice from 1866. For those enduring April Showers - Determine at least to have sunshine in the house, if you cannot have it outside... More Fun Discoveries Chocolate Caramels ~1897 Snowballs for Dessert ~1866 Mulled Wine ~ 1876

Curved Bottoms on Wine Bottles ~1912

Why Wine Bottles Have Dimpled Bottoms. Have you ever wondered why a wine bottle has a dent on the bottom? Wonder no more! According to this 1912 newspaper excerpt it is to facilitate the cooling or warming of the liquid inside. Seems scientific enough. And obviously calls for experimentation. But is it true? The Wine... Continue Reading →

$1 Dollar Dinners ~1906

Delicious Dinners at a Cost of $1. This a fascinating read. You find the complete menu - soup, main, sides, drinks - as well as a breakdown of the costs and tips for cooking. I don't think you could do this today. For those who shop for whole ingredients, it's easy to see the inflationary... Continue Reading →

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