The Woman Who Laughs ~1889

The trick of always seeing the bright side, or, if the matter has no bright side, of shining up the dark one, is a very important faculty... A warming message for the day. More Delightful Discoveries All Housewives May Add Wines to Their Household Stores ~1856 Dandelion Salad ~1844 Whortleberry Fried-Cakes ~1886 Source: St. Paul…

Illustration: Pastry ~1886

Today's post is dedicated to all of the Cook's Illustrated enthusiasts out there! Thank you, Miss Corson, for keeping it real for all 19th century home cooks. More Fun Discoveries Corn Bread Recipe ~1905 At the Head of the Vegetable Class Stands Bread ~1856 Cannelons With Cream ~1886 Source: Miss Corson's Practical American Cookery and…

Salamanders: Not a Recipe ~1886

Salamanders are used to heat up dishes without placing them in an oven. What I can't figure out is how the second salamander works. The angle seems odd. Source: Miss Corson's Practical American Cookery and Household Management, 1886. All of our ailments…proceed from a disordered stomach, 1856 Maccaroni, with Cheese 1881 Medicinal Preparations And Herbs,…

A Slow But Sure Poison ~1856

Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall, 1856. Alas, modern cookbooks lack a certain something when it comes to poison warnings... Why is it called German silver? In the late 1700s, German metalworks were the first Europeans who were able to copy the technique carried over from China. In the early 1800s, Germany…

Recipe To Petrify Wood ~1856

Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall, 1856 Obviously, this recipe falls squarely on the domestic economy side of the publication. One is left wondering, however, why a Victorian homemaker would have need of a recipe to petrify wood? Stopping a leak, cleaning brass, even making cement I understand - but petrifying wood?…