Mrs. Crowen’s Cooking Advice

10 Quotes from a 19th Century Cook.

It may not be generally understood, but it is most certainly true, that to prepare simple food is as much a work of art as the mystifications and elaborations of the cuisine.

Many persons possessing unlimited means prefer the less luxurious preparations.

One who is not a good judge of fish, had better not trust to their own choice, but deal with those on whose word they can rely.

Many a feud-divided family have been united, and misunderstanding friends been brought together, under the all-pervading hospitality and genial influence which distinguishes New Year’s day.

If fresh, a lobster will be lively and the claws have a strong motion when the eyes are pressed with the finger.

The male [lobster] is best for boiling; the flesh is firmer and the shell as brighter red.

The appearance of a boiled dinner may be greatly improved by the manner of serving up the vegetables.

Mashed potatoes may be heaped on a flat dish; make it in a crown, or pineapple; stick a sprig of green celery or parsley on top.

Quite indifferent butter may be made sweet and good by pouring brine over, and allowing it to remain for a few weeks, or longer, before using.

And for dessert…

A nice dessert may be made by stewing fruit of any sort; make it quite sweet, butter some slices of bread, lay them on a dish, and pour the stewed fruit over and serve hot.

Source: Mrs. Crowen’s American Cookery book. (that’s an affiliate link)

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