Fried Cauliflower ~1887

Fried Cauliflower Recipe.

Fried Cauliflower

Fried Cauliflower Recipe 1887

Servings: 4
Time: 25 min.

Ingredients

  • 1 small cauliflower
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 2 Tbsp. flour
  • Salt
  • Oil for frying

This was a fun recipe. It takes some work to get egg whites stiff – and then when you mix together with the yolk past everything just sort of combines (it almost seems like it isn’t worth it). You need to work fast to get the cauliflower dipped quickly and into the oil before the whites lose all of their body.

Because there is very little flour, the cauliflower comes out very light and airy – almost like a tempura.

Note: I did use an all-purpose gluten-free flour. Worked like a charm.

Source: The Original White House Cook Book, 1887 Edition.

More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks

19 thoughts on “Fried Cauliflower ~1887

Add yours

  1. Always had this growing up and I still make it often (sometimes cooked in tomato sauce after frying), though I use the whole eggs rather than whip the whites separately.

    I’m wondering what constancy the flour had back then. I’m guessing it wasn’t as fine as we have now.
    I’m also wondering what did they mean by “oyster plant”?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, with tomato sauce sounds divine!

      I’ve thought the same thing about the flour. I’ll keep an eye out for ‘how to buy flour’ sections, though I can’t remember coming across something like that (probably because I’m gluten-free and we don’t do a ton of baking). Oyster plant is another name for salsify – one of those roots/tubers you can fry up as well.

      Liked by 1 person

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