Samp ~1847

Corn Husk Porridge.

Samp_Recipe

Samp is a new one for me. Our friend Wikipedia writes that samp is the corn kernels which are removed and ground into the dish. This recipe clearly describes the husk and skin of the corn proper…

Now, this recipe comes from a book called: Cheap receipts and hints on cookery; collected for distribution amongst the Irish peasantry in 1847, so it is very likely the husk and skin of the corn.

Thoughts?

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7 thoughts on “Samp ~1847

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  1. It is just corn meal. They are saying to husk the dried corn and remove the kernels. Crush them by beating them. You are to put them in water and cook them like dried peas. Think grits or cornmeal mush. Irish spoke Gaelic so this was written in their English interpretation. The recipe is telling them the corn was better for them then peas

    Civil War soldiers was give rations of dried corn. They would soak the kernels and mix them with flour and a pinch of salt and form patties. They would fry them. They were called corn oysters. Many of the soldiers were Scott/Irish and had come here because of the famines.

    This was during the potato famines. (1845-1853)

    If you have more recipes from that pamphlet. you should share them. Some of today’s recipes have roots in this era.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Fascinating! That makes a lot more sense than just the husk. There are tons of corn recipes-which makes sense. Minimal meat recipes, no desserts or sugars. It must have 50 ways to make gruel.😉

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