English, French, German, Italian, and American Household Management in the Early 1900s

Apologies for the more lengthy excerpt, but I thought this was too delightful not to share!

Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 6.11.45 AMThe English household comes across as ‘just-so’. This would be the Downton Abby – era household.

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As for the French, I’ve never heard of a “dot” before, but figured it was a dowry. A quick internet search and we learn that the dowry in French is quittance de dot.

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The German excerpt certainly lives up to its cultural heritage of efficiency and “capable management!”Screen Shot 2018-02-16 at 6.12.31 AMItalianHouseholdManagement1915

Wouldn’t it be lovely to have your personal chef come in once a day to consult on the menu, buy fresh ingredients daily, and cook the meals? Love the bit about the “earthen jar filled with olive oil from which he dips what he needs and which never turns rancid.”

Beautiful imagery.

AmercianHouseholdManagement1915

And then we get to the Americans…sigh.

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I hope you enjoyed this brief globe-trotting trip of 19th century households.

Would love to hear your reactions to this in the remarks section below!

More Fun Discoveries

Source: Efficiency in the household : a book for every woman by Franks, Thetta Quay, 1915

 

4 thoughts on “Household Management: 4 Cultures 1915

  1. European snobs. At that time they did look down on the new rich in America. LOL..My grandmother came here as a servant from Germany at the age of 12, She was trained in Germany to work as an assistant to a cook. She thought she was awarded a scholarship to attend school here but ended up washing dishes for a wealthy family that had paid her way to this country. She worked 6 years and married a man that was 10 years older then her. She brought her family here with the money she saved working. And spent the rest of her life as a Dairy farmer’s wife. She married in 1896.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is an AMAZING saga – it almost seems like something out of novel…That you know the story is even more striking – quite the oral history. I couldn’t imagine how scared and confused she must have been at 12 in a strange country. Oh my!

      Liked by 1 person

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