Soup: The Province of The Cook ~1856

“There is no dish, perhaps, that comes to the table which gives such general satisfaction as well prepared soup.”

My children would agree!

This is a wonderful introduction on the topic of making soup. There are so many little bits of advice throughout. For example, I didn’t know that skimming soup when it first boils would help to keep the broth clear. It also makes sense that your dried herbs should be labeled. Admittedly, I’ve had a few occasions when I’ve hung herbs to dry only to come back several weeks later and realize I’ve forgotten what they are…

On the issue of using garlic and onion sparingly, I’m not sure. Onion is one of my go-to soup ingredients.

Finally,we have this admonishment, “It should be the province of the cook to be always in a position to produce (soup) at a short notice.” Here! Here!

Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall. (1856).

More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks

5 thoughts on “Soup: The Province of The Cook ~1856

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    1. I’m not sure. I’ve noticed that boiling the rice/grain with the soup makes it cloudy. If I add already cooked, it remains clear. I’ve also noticed that if I bring it to a gentle boil instead of a hard boil, the broth remains clear. One way around this, of course, is to go for a cream-of-something soup. 🙂 Honestly, when our household is in the mood for soup, nobody really cares what it looks like!!! Thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

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