Classic: Broiled Salmon ~1922

Source: Good Housekeeping's Book of Menus, Recipes, and Household Discoveries, 2nd Ed., 1922. Why mess with the classics? I cross referenced salmon recipes from three separate cookbooks (1856, 1905, 1922) and they are essentially the same: sprinkle the salmon with salt, pepper, and butter. Broil/bake at a low temperature. Garnish with parsley. Substitute the butter…

A Slow But Sure Poison ~1856

Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall, 1856. Alas, modern cookbooks lack a certain something when it comes to poison warnings... Why is it called German silver? In the late 1700s, German metalworks were the first Europeans who were able to copy the technique carried over from China. In the early 1800s, Germany…

Calumet Baking Powder ~1917

Source: Winston Graphic, January 18, 1917. Talk about light, fluffy, tempting, and wholesome Jelly Rolls, Cakes, Biscuits, and other good things! My! But Calumet baking powder certainly beats the band for sure results - for purity, economy, and wholesome bakings. Tell your mother to try the Calumet Baking Powder on the money-back guarantee. Received high…

Recipe To Petrify Wood ~1856

Source: Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy, E. Hall, 1856 Obviously, this recipe falls squarely on the domestic economy side of the publication. One is left wondering, however, why a Victorian homemaker would have need of a recipe to petrify wood? Stopping a leak, cleaning brass, even making cement I understand - but petrifying wood?…