Five Food Principles

Framework for an Early Food Pyramid. Or My Plate, they both work. This excerpt comes from the book Practical Cooking and Serving, 1902. As you read through it, you'll notice that the author has a very scientific orientation towards cooking. We're moving into an era when cooking becomes a science to be understood and mastered.... Continue Reading →

Introducing Icings ~1902

Frosting and Icing Recipes. Cooked and Uncooked Icings. Homemade icing is simple to make, yet the automatic reflex is to reach for the pre-made frosting in a plastic tub on the grocer's shelf. Why is that? It always leaves a cloying taste of sweetened preservatives that only the kids will eat (by the spoonful, no... Continue Reading →

Chef’s Coffee ~1923

It is not difficult to make Coffee as I make it if you will but try. Follow carefully these six rules and you will have solved le grand secret. So easy to do - such a difference in flavor.

Antique Meat Thermometer

Pork Roast Temperatures. Mercurial Readings. What is the appropriate internal temperature for a pork roast? Seems like an easy enough question. However, did you know that the USDA updated the guidelines for safe pork temperatures just recently in 2011? News to me. They now recommend that pork is safe at 145°F. I'm not big on... Continue Reading →

Tomato Chowder ~1922

Quick and Savory Tomato Soup. Gluten Free Recipe from the 1920s. This tomato chowder recipe calls for fat, which makes for a savory soup worthy of the coldest February day. I threw all of the ingredients into the slow cooker and put it on high for 4 hours. Turned out great. Servings: 6 Prep Time:... Continue Reading →

A Lesson on Beef ~1902

Cows in Old Cookbooks. Moo. Let beeves and home-bred kine partake The sweets of Burn-Mill meadow. - Wordsworth By the time we move into the late 1800s and early 1900s, cookbooks have settled into some predictable patterns. Chapters are mostly divided into the type of dish being served, for example cakes or soups, or the... Continue Reading →

To My Dearest Valentine

Valentine Greetings from the 1800s. Pray, Sweetheart, send me just a line, To say you'll be my Valentine. By Dandelion post I send, This Valentine to my friend, May every flying seedlet be A message of love to thee. The honey dew is on thy lip, Fain would I thee entwine. And draughts of love... Continue Reading →

Dora and Jack 1923

Cream of Wheat Advertisement. Love this Cream of Wheat advertisement from a 1923 American Cookery magazine. How will you, dear reader, spend Valentine's Day? Any romantic plans? Maybe spend a few moments making googly eyes over a bowl of hot cereal in the morning before dashing off to work? Wisps of steam curling through the... Continue Reading →

The Coffee Executive ~1923

Coffee is the greatest drink in the world for business men. I drink it in the morning, of course, and again at four o'clock. Great idea! I do more work now from four to five than I used to do all afternoon.

Lemonade ~1911

Delicious Homemade Lemonade. What irony is it that winter brings us fresh citrus best intended for the refreshing beverages of warmer days? The local lemon trees are peeking with their golden offerings, compelling us to roll up our sleeves and don the apron. This simple lemonade recipe makes just over two quarts, more than enough... Continue Reading →

Late 1800s Domestic Help

Household Staffing: Servants, Maids, Butlers. Domestic Workers in Homes Large and Small. Wouldn't it be lovely to have an extra pair of hands to help with the drudgery of chores? Shopping, cooking, cleaning, gardening, minding the children... And what about 30 pairs of hands? Today's excerpt comes from The new cyclopædia of domestic economy, and... Continue Reading →

Mary’s Clam Soup ~1875

5 Ingredients or Less Clam Soup Recipe. Hmm... Maybe just make clams in white sauce? Dispense with the soup label. Looks yummy, but there really isn't much in it other than the clams and the butter fat from the cream. It certainly doesn't qualify as a chowder. This particular clam soup recipe calls for 50... Continue Reading →

Classic Potato Soup ~1875

Handwritten Potato Soup Recipe from the 1870s. Here's a gem! Discovering handwritten recipes from the past neatly tucked into cookbooks is like taking hold of one end of a silk ribbon, the other end traversing a winding path through time to the hand of the original author. And like that, we, dear reader, are connected... Continue Reading →

Easy Celery Soup ~1875

Victorian Era Celery Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! I enjoy cream of celery soup, but have yet to make a truly appetizing plain celery soup. Tried a recipe from Mrs. Beeton's a year or so ago, but evidently didn't post it so must not have been anything special and followed the same principles above.... Continue Reading →

Soup a la Julienne ~1875

Victorian Era Vegetable Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Carrot Soup ~1819 Camping Soup ~1910 Stock ~1855

Classic Mulligatawney ~1875

Mulligatawny Soup Recipe. Soup! Wonderful, nourishing soup! This week we celebrate National Soup Day (February 4). But it's February. And it's soup. So I'm posting a soup recipe for each day of the week! Mulligatawny is an English soup recipe that probably crossed into British cuisine during the colonial period. It is a curry-style soup... Continue Reading →

Cabinet Pudding Recipe ~1886

Have you ever had leftover cake in the back of the fridge that's past its prime? Do not throw it out! This  cabinet pudding recipe from 1886 uses stale cake for a novel boiled pudding. Easy to make and delicious.

February Menu ~1884

February Menu 1884. Welcome February! Still waiting for the farmers market to usher in spring vegetables. And waiting... My favorite vendor said that the farm won't have new produce crops until mid-March. Alas, we make do with dandelion greens for salads, parsley, and the ever optimistic seasonal citrus. At some point, I'm going to cover... Continue Reading →

Household Tips ~1923

Advice on Brooms, Bread, and Cake Molds. Eclectic list of household advice from The Neighbor: Keep salt and pepper shaker on the kitchen range. It is handy when seasoning food. (Mine are on top of the microwave). Encircle all new brooms with a section of stocking leg, it will wear longer. A few drops of... Continue Reading →

Kitchen Design ~1827

1800s Kitchens.For your leisurely Sunday consumption, I offer you these remarks on the Victorian kitchen:It is an undisputed fact, that no person can work without tools; and in proportion to the completeness and fitness of the tools furnished, labour is facilitated, and a more perfect performance may be expected. These remarks apply, in no small... Continue Reading →

Cheese Straws ~1895

Gluten Free Cheese Straws. Updated Recipe: Preheat oven to 425 F. Line cookie sheet with parchment paper. 1/4 cup butter 1/3 cup parmesan 1/2 cup all-purpose gluten free baking flour (or regular) 1/2 cup gluten free bread crumbs Dash of cayenne and mace to taste 1/8 tsp. salt, omit if using salted butter Note: You can... Continue Reading →

Frugal Friday ~1917

Classic Tips for Saving Food. Happy Friday, all! Made it through another week. I was in the car the other day with The Boy and we heard a public service message about food waste. Did you know: Consumers are responsible for more wasted food than farmers, grocery stores, restaurants, or any other part of the... Continue Reading →

Preserving Butter ~1827

Three Options for Saving Butter. Nostalgic for Creameries. The word creamery conjures images of black and white Holstein dairy cows grazing on green fields of wavy grassland dotted with white daisies and yellow clover under azure blue skies filled with happy, puffy white clouds. Growing up in a rural town surrounded by pasturelands, our class... Continue Reading →

A Concise History of Home Distillery

What Is Distillation?
Distillation is a process of purifying liquids through controlled boiling and condensation. A liquid is converted into a gas/vapour through heat, and then recondensed through cooling to return the vapor to a liquid form. Distillation was used to make fragrances, medicinal cordials, and liquors.

Victor Hugo and Eggs ~1895

What Victor Hugo Says about Eggs. Victor Hugo was accustomed to say that there were few things more inherently equivocal than an egg, and that he never broke the shell of one without a dim apprehension that the unexpected might suddenly make its appearance. Source: The Thorough Good Cook, 1895. More Fun Discoveries from Antique... Continue Reading →

The New London Cookery ~1827

Frugality. Comfort. Elegance. Title page and frontispiece from the New London Cookery Book. Lovely. And... Numerous Useful Miscellaneous Receipts. Source: New London Cookery, By A Lady, 1827. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks The Farmer’s Wife Introduction ~1780 Summer Luncheon Menu ~1913 Household Finances ~1819  

On Ghosts and Potatoes ~1895

Cooking with Potatoes in the 1800s. Madame de Stael said that she did not believe in ghosts, but that she was afraid of them. Not much more paradoxical is it, I hope, for me to say that, although I do not believe in potatoes, I recognise their great value in the alimentation of humanity. The... Continue Reading →

5 Companies Over 100

Brands Still Around Today. Question: If you were to invest in one company and had to keep your money invested in that company for the next 50 years, what company would you pick? That is essentially the question that I stumbled across on Reddit the other day, which got me thinking about consumer product companies... Continue Reading →

Surprise Eggs ~1895

Literary References in Old Cookbooks. Esteemed Reader, Today's recipe includes a history lesson, cultural references, something of a Victorian rant, and a glimpse of a colorful past. Case in point, we learn that one-third of the crime in this world is due to the direct, although inscrutable, instrumentality of the Devil. I need to use... Continue Reading →

Plain Cake for Children ~1861

Children's Victorian Cake Recipe. Procuring Dough. Curious ingredients. The cake recipe outsources the dough to the local baker, which, as a busy mom, I think is a brilliant solution. They didn't have biscuit tubes or box cake mixes, but this would have been the next best thing. A quartern of dough is about four pounds,... Continue Reading →

How to Drink Milk ~1897

1890s Directions for Drinking Milk. Happy National Milk Day! Do not swallow milk fast and in such big gulps. Sip it slowly. Take four minutes at least to finish a glassful, and do not take more than a good teaspoonful at one sip. When milk goes into your stomach it is instantly curdled. If you... Continue Reading →

Treating Frozen Limbs ~1820

The Successful Treatment of Frozen Limbs in Russia Early 1800s. Today's excerpt comes from The Husbandman and Housewife. The book is exhaustive in terms of breadth and the contents are arranged alphabetically instead of by category. This results in Dressing Fowls immediately preceding Frostbitten Feet. However, after spending time exploring the contents, I have never... Continue Reading →

Housekeeping Accounts ~1872

Tips for Household Management in the 1870s. When we think about managing our household budgets to maximize our savings (economy) today, what comes to mind? Certainly buying in bulk, perhaps with coupons or from club stores. Perhaps price checking at the store or even between stores in the weekly circulars that get mailed out. The... Continue Reading →

On Beverages ~1861

General Observations on Victorian Drinks. Beverages are innumerable in their variety... and may be divided into three classes. We will, however, forthwith treat on the most popular of our beverages beginning with the one which makes "the cup that cheers but not inebriates." Any recipe requests from the list? From Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861.... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton’s Simple Coffee ~1861

A Very Simple Method of Making Coffee. Coffee Preparation in the 1860s All I have to say is: Thank goodness for paper filters! Which leads us to some very interesting trivia. The paper coffee filter was invented by a woman, Melitta Bentz, in 1908. No surprise that a woman would have invented the paper filter.... Continue Reading →

Wine Plans ~2019

New Year Wine Project. Have you ever gotten to a point in a hobby where you need to reassess? Every new year deserves a new project of sorts and I find myself surrounded by a slowly growing quantity of winemaking equipment. And while I honestly don't mind that there's a grape press next to my... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Cocoa Recipe ~1861

How To Make Cocoa. Who doesn't love a mug of hot cocoa in mid-winter? This particular recipe, I believe, is missing a key ingredient: sugar. I was out of instant hot chocolate the other weekend and was scouring the cupboard for a special breakfast treat for the kids. The Hershey's powdered baking cocoa has a... Continue Reading →

Articles in Season ~1872

Seasonal January Foods. Welcome January! The local farmers market marches doggedly into the new year. Pale hot house tomatoes, the last of the winter greens, and carrots debut for us loyal shoppers. I'm dreaming of flats of ruby strawberries... We do get lemons. Lovely sunny spheres hinting at the promise of spring. How much longer... Continue Reading →

Ginger Wine Recipe ~1770

How to Make Ginger Wine. Ginger wine is traditionally made from ginger and raisins and first appeared in Britain in the 1740s. The wine can be fortified with brandy or cognac, or even diluted with lemonade. An interesting historical note: There was a widely held belief at the time that ginger wine helped prevent cholera,... Continue Reading →

January Menu ~1884

January Dinner Menu from the 1880s. January Menu Welcome January! This bill of fare for 8 people includes rice, salmon, boiled potatoes, beef fillet, cauliflower, turkey with jelly, celery, and plum pudding. A heart meal for the middle of winter. Happy New Year! Source: Franco-American Cookery Book, 1844. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Pork... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Thick Gingerbread ~1861

Classic Gingerbread Recipe. Another seasonal recipe from Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. Come to think of it, ginger 'bread' typically refers to the cookie sort of dessert, not the cake 'bread' version - at least here regionally. Why is that? Treacle is the British term for molasses, lest there be any confusion. Confession time. I... Continue Reading →

Celebrating New Year’s Eve Victorian Style.

Dinner. Dancing. Merriment. Starting with dinner. A full menu with oysters, crudités, bass, Hollandaise sauce, melted potatoes, prime beef, Yorkshire pudding, brussel sprouts, stuffed eggplant, a goose, sweet potatoes, celery, beets, mayonnaise, plum pudding with hard sauce, cheese, fruit and coffee. Moving to dancing. To general merriment. Bon-bon parties! Bean bag parties! And oh-so much more! How... Continue Reading →

Pineapple Beer ~1875

Easy Pineapple Beer Recipe. Ever wonder what you can do with the inedible parts of the pineapple? Time for a fizzy drink! This recipe was originally posted a few months back, and I finally had some pineapple remnants to give it a try. The result is a refreshing, lightly-sweetened, non-alcoholic beverage. Mexicans have a similar... Continue Reading →

Mrs. Beeton Christmas Cake ~1861

Simple Christmas Cake Recipe. This Christmas Cake recipe is from the famous Mrs. Beeton's recipe collection c. 1861. A few things about this particular recipe. First, I think it's fascinating how the editors include the average cost of the recipe at the end of each recipe. 1 s. = 1 shilling 6 d. = 6... Continue Reading →

Sleigh Ride ~1898

Edison's Sleigh Ride Move. A short silent film of sleighs in New York by Edison. A bit off topic from cooking/food/homelife, but it certainly gets one in the mood for the holidays! Enjoy! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Plain and Elaborate Christmas Dinners ~1904 Cornucopia ~2018 Salted Almonds ~1922

Christmas ~1900

Classic Christmas Print from Puck. Getting into the spirit! Source: Christmas Number, 1900. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Mistletoe ~1898 A Supper in December ~1770 Christmas Turkey ~1855

Folding Napkins ~1872

Victorian Napkin Diagrams. I believe diagrams such as these were arguably the inspiration behind YouTube. #howtofoldcoolnapkins #ThankYouYouTube Source: The new cyclopædia of domestic economy, and practical housekeeper. Adapted to all classes of society and comprising subjects connected with the interests of every family, and five thousand practical receipts and maxims. From the best English, French,... Continue Reading →

Nutmegs

Classic Recipes Baking with Nutmegs. Getting my nutmeg on with seasonal recipes. Picked up this jar from the store the other day and it sparked images of great trade ships with sails full to the wind embarking on multi-year journeys to bring back this fragrant treasure. Nutmeg was a popular spice 150+ years ago, used in... Continue Reading →

Mistletoe ~1898

Victorian Mistletoe Poem. With her defiant air she sits beneath the chandelier; There hangs a spray of mistletoe, but still she shows no fear. Who wants to kiss his sweetheart when her brother's standing near? More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Plain and Elaborate Christmas Dinners ~1904 Holiday Beverages ~1902 A Christmas Party ~1866

Unprofitable Christmas ~1897

Christmas Humor from the 1890s. Just a quick post for today. Not technically food-related, but had to share. Off to work on Christmas preparations! Have a great one, all! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Happy Greasy Food Day ~1875 Orange Wine ~1837 Onion Sauce ~1855  

On Puddings ~1747

3 Classic Recipes for Puddings from the Georgian Era. Today we have three distinct pudding recipes. I'm adding them to the blog as a sort of indexed reminder as I would very much like to come back and try them. The lemons are in season here and I pass several trees tucked away in the... Continue Reading →

Cookbook Subscribers ~1747

How Books Were Printed in the 1700s. Looking for Character Names? In the Introduction to The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy (1747), written by A Lady, the authoress includes a list of names of subscribers. Here's what the interwebs have to say about subscribers, credit to U Penn Library for writing about the... Continue Reading →

A Supper in December ~1770

Georgian Menu and Table Layout. Source: The complete English cook; or, Prudent housewife. Being, a collection of the most general, yet least expensive receipts in every branch of cookery and good housewifery, with directions for roasting, boiling, stewing [etc.] ... together with directions for placing dishes on tables of entertainment: and many other things equally... Continue Reading →

A Dinner in December ~1770

Georgian Dinner Menu and Table Layout. Source: The complete English cook; or, Prudent housewife. Being, a collection of the most general, yet least expensive receipts in every branch of cookery and good housewifery, with directions for roasting, boiling, stewing [etc.] ... together with directions for placing dishes on tables of entertainment: and many other things... Continue Reading →

Plain and Elaborate Christmas Dinners ~1904

Christmas Menus for All Budgets and Households.   This series of menus really offers a unique glimpse into how families of different sizes and means would celebrate the holiday dinner. There are some similarities: oysters, roast turkey, cranberries, salted nuts, and coffee. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Dear Santa ~1900 On Oysters and Chicken... Continue Reading →

Snapdragon and Roast Goose ~1900

1900s Christmas Game. Yup. I've been to parties where I could see that people would think that lighting alcohol on fire would be a good idea. And for the table: Roast Goose Recipe Source: Cameron County Press, 1900. More Fun Discoveries From Antique Cookbooks Christmas Dinner Menu ~1889 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 Christmas Eggnog... Continue Reading →

Christmas Turkey ~1855

Boiled Turkey and Gravy Recipe. This recipe is taken from Soyer's shilling cookery for the people.  The cooking method is ingenious, as it's a one-pot Christmas dinner. Included: stuffing, gravy, and soup! I love that it adds bacon to the pot for both salt and flavor. Has anyone tried boiling a whole turkey? I may have... Continue Reading →

Hot Wine 1912

Warm Wine Recipe with Lemon and Cinnamon. Red or white? Either works! Classic mulled wine recipe to warm you inside and out through those long, frigid nights with just a few simple ingredients: Wine Brown sugar Cinnamon Orange/lemon rind Cheers! Source: Simple Italian Cookery, 1912 More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Soup for the Poor... Continue Reading →

Cornucopia ~2018

Homemade Gifts of Bounty. Quiet day on the homefront today. Spontaneous day off from the CinC allowed me to spend the morning at the DMV and then work on some stuff here and think about the holiday season coming up. I enjoy gifting presents of food and beverage. It's the physical embodiment of nurturing through... Continue Reading →

Holiday Humor ~1899

Victorian Christmas Cartoon Late 1800s. Happy holidays! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks. A Little Cooking Humor ~1897 10 Victorian Jokes ~ Advertisements 1897      

Coffee Monday El Perco ~1911

Happy Monday! How about free coffee and wafers while you're shopping? El Perco - Is this short for The Perco(lator)? Very clever, indeed. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Camping Soup ~1910 Fried Quoits~1910 Lighthouse Kitchen ~1855

Holiday Beverages ~1902

Wassail. Champagne Cup. Mulled Wine. Ale Flip. Metheglin. We just don't get recipes like this anymore in our daily newspaper. Sign of the times...Compliments of the New York Daily Tribune, 1902. Enjoy! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks White House Christmas Dinner ~1889 Maryland Egg-Nogg ~1889 A Christmas Party ~1866

December’s Kitchen Garden ~1744

Things to do in you garden in December. Welcome December! Are we dreaming of summer yet? Digressing slightly from the usual practice of posting a monthly menu on the first day of the new month, and instead offering a companion gardner for December from Adam's Luxury and Eve's Cookery. The book includes a monthly to-do... Continue Reading →

Collyflowers! ~1744

Three Cauliflower Recipes from the 1700s. Vindication at last that it is, indeed, pronounced collyflower - one of my favorite words to play with. Not only that, but you can pluralize it! (Oh my, spell checker doesn't like me at all! Not to fret, I've added it to the dictionary so that from here on... Continue Reading →

Apple Cyder ~1744

To Make Cyder. Apple cider is relatively simple to make. This recipe from 1744 is actually spot-on in terms of process. I started the batch above this past week (had to make room for the turkey!) and you'll note my bag is similar to the 'fine hair bag' mentioned. Also note the use of brimstone... Continue Reading →

Apple Tansey ~1744

Apple Tansey Recipe. This apple recipe is new for me. The interwebs has a surprising amount of information about the history of Apple Tansey, and informs us that the recipe was popular among colonists. Those recipes seem to call for flour, which is conspicuously absent from this present version. I would think that adding the flour... Continue Reading →

Corby Cake ~1915

Celebrating National Cake Day! More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Chocolate Cake ~1897 Golden Sunshine Cake – 1922 Meets 2017 Teen Cannelons With Cream ~1886

To Re-Cook Cold Turkey ~1881

Leftover Turkey Recipe. Hope all of my readers who celebrate Thanksgiving enjoyed a lovely day! We had the traditional meal here with my folks. Good company, good food, good memories. Of course, one of the side benefits of having a large, traditional feast are the leftovers. It's an excuse to eat that piece of pumpkin... Continue Reading →

Thanksgiving ~1911

Thanksgiving from the Bisbee Daily, 1911. Happy Holidays,  Convivial Supper More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Jellied Turkey ~1897 To Re-Cook Cold Turkey 1881 Inseparable from the Charm of the Turkey Is the Dressing Thereof ~1905  

Late 1800s Thanksgiving

Classic Thanksgiving Recipes. How about: Chicken Pie, Stuffing, Orange Salad, Corn Pudding, and Banana Fritters? Nice to mix it up from the old turkey and cranberry routine! Still not thrilled with the quality of the images, but the content is there! Turkey Alternative. Stuffing. Sides. Dessert. Source: The Anaconda Standard, 1898. More Fun Discoveries from Antique... Continue Reading →

7 Thanksgiving Menus ~1898

Good Things to Eat on Thanksgiving. Admittedly, the images on these menus are pretty poor. However, this find is such a delight that they just had to be shared. Check out the link below to see the entire page - recipes and all. Too busy changing the sheets for your house guests' imminent arrival? Or... Continue Reading →

Thanksgiving ~1895

I love this image. Incredibly modern, yet technically still in the Victorian period from 1895. Is it turkey time yet?!? Source: The Chap Book, 1895. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Thanksgiving Dinner ~1866 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 Thanksgiving Pie “The Crown of the Feast”~1866

Thanksgiving ~1904

Thanksgiving Huntress. I prefer my turkey plucked and packaged, but there are wild turkeys around these here parts. Maybe next year... Source: Puck, 1904. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Thanksgiving Dinner ~1866 Remarks on Pie Making ~1866 Thanksgiving Pie “The Crown of the Feast”~1866

Thanksgiving Proclamation ~1863

Lincoln's Creation of a Holiday. Lincoln's proclamation to the nation creating Thanksgiving as a holiday as respite for a nation at war. Eloquent. Somber. Reflective. Source: The Smoky Hill and Republic Union, 1863. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Roast Turkey ~1875 Food Saving Tips ~1819 Friday Menu ~1910

Roast Turkey ~1875

Roasting Turkey. Seven more days until turkey time! This roast turkey recipe is surprisingly detailed. You crush the point of the breast-bone with a rolling pint, serve with curled sausage, and cranberries. I might try rubbing my turkey in an onion. Fun read. Source: In the Kitchen, 1875. More Fun Discoveries from Antique Cookbooks Inseparable... Continue Reading →

Golden Sunshine Cake ~1914

Easy Golden Sunshine Cake Recipe. The Girl turns 16 today. Wow! How did that happen? Cake time! I thought I had purchased a gluten free cake mix, but discovered that it was, in fact, a pizza mix lurking in the corner of the pantry. Oops. Plan B was to make a golden sunshine cake that... Continue Reading →

Carving ~1875

How to Carve a Turkey Time to ramp up the Thanksgiving holiday cooking-theme. I always thought it was an interesting dichotomy growing up: The Matriarch did the roasting. The Patriarch did the carving. Here was see the gender divide as well. Today? Well, if you're going to fry it in peanut oil, then I'm fine... Continue Reading →

Coffee Monday Yuban WWI ~1917

WWI Yuban Coffee Advertisement. To all who celebrate Armistice Day or Veterans Day. "There is no shortage of coffee. You may drink as much as you are accustomed to - You will not deprive the soldiers or the women and children abroad of their share." Great find! Happy Monday! More Fun Discoveries American Domestic Cookery... Continue Reading →

Don’t Waste Bread ~1916

Le Pain. Translation: Our duty is not to waste bread. From a group of posters designed by school children and others, some marked "Affiche composée par les enfants de France pour la prévoyance et les économies." Celebrating the 100th anniversary to the end of WWI. To honor the event, I am sharing several posters under... Continue Reading →

WWI Save Bread Propaganda ~1919

Eat Potatoes. From a group of posters designed by school children. As someone who is deathly allergic to bread, these children largely reflect how I feel in the kitchen... The 100th anniversary of the end of WWI is coming up. To honor the event, I'll be sharing several posters under the category: 'Economic and Industrial... Continue Reading →

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